Fruiting Trees, Shrubs, and Plants

Apples Peaches Plums Nectarines Apricots Cherries PawPaws Persimmons Blueberries Raspberries Blackberries Gooseberries Grapes Goji Berries Kiwis Strawberries Rhubarb

Useful Links

How to plant fruit trees: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/planting_fruit_trees

Growing tree fruits at home: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/resources/michigan_fresh_growing_tree_fruits_at_home

Apple varieties: http://www.michiganapples.com/About/Varieties

Growing apple trees in the Midwest: http://www.extension.umn.edu/garden/yard-garden/fruit/apples-in-home-garden/index.html

Apple Ripening Chart: http://mooreorchards.com/index.php/our-apples/ripening-information.html

Home-Grown Peaches: http://extension.uga.edu/publications/detail.cfm?number=C1063

How to grow small fruits: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/resources/michigan_fresh_growing_small_fruits_at_home

Pure Pucker Power: Common Persimmon: http://www.eattheweeds.com/persimmons-pure-pucker-power-2/

Growing blueberries: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/topic/blueberries/growing_blueberries

Steps to Success (blackberries, blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, currants, and gooseberries): http://noursefarms.com/steps-to-success/

Integrated pest management for your vegetable garden: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/ipm_smart_pest_management_for_the_vegetable_garden

Starting a vegetable garden: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/planting_a_smart_vegetable_garden

Apples:

HoneycrispHoneycrisp: Widely publicized, Honeycrisp is a cross between Keepsake and an unknown apple variety. Originally thought to be a cross of Honeygold and Macoun, DNA testing has eliminated those apples as parents. This apple was developed by fruit breeders at the University of Minnesota. Until 2009, the university received royalties for every apple tree sold by any and every nursery in the US. This apple reaches its sweet, crisp perfection when grown in central and northern Michigan.
Rootstock Emla 106: This rootstock produces a tree about half to two-thirds the size of a standard tree. It does not sucker and the rootstock is resistant to wooly aphid. EMLA 106 has been planted intensively in the East and West and is an excellent producer. It should be planted on well-drained soil as it is susceptible to crown rot.

LodiMutsu/Crispin: Mutsu (pronounced moo-tsoo) was rated near the top of many taste tests, although pies made from it aren’t as highly rated. We have found many customers search this apple out when they are making sauce. This is a very large apple whose white flesh is crisp and juicy and has a touch of tartness. Mutsu is a cross of Golden Delicious and Indo. It was developed in Japan in the 1930s and first introduced into America after WWII.

Rootstock Emla 111: This rootstock produces a tree about two-thirds the size of a standard tree. Vigorous scion varieties and better soils may grow to three-quarter size or larger. EMLA 111 is a good producing rootstock, is well anchored and tolerant of drought conditions. It is widely adapted to most soil conditions.


scarlettspurRed Delicious (Scarlet Spur II strain): For almost two decades, Scarlet Spur was the most popular Red Delicious in the world with literally hundreds of thousands of acres in production. Now comes the next generation of America’s earliest, best coloring Red Delicious, Scarlet Spur II. Although Scarlet Spur® II finishes coloring about three days earlier than its parent, it has all the winning characteristics of the original – dark mahogany color, crisp white flesh, excellent fruit production and outstanding type.

Rootstock Emla 7: A tree on this rootstock will be 50 to 60 percent smaller than a standard tree. Trees on this clone are the most popular of all the rootstock we grow. EMLA 7 does well on most soils. Some support may be needed in early years. EMLA 7 is very winter hardy. It is susceptible to suckering. EMLA 7 is extremely tolerant to fire blight.

Auvil Early FujiFuji (Auvil Early Fuji strain): When Grady Auvil discovered this new Fuji sport, he predicted “it will revolutionize the Fuji market.” This sensational new strain matures about six weeks ahead of standard Red Fuji sports yet produces a higher percentage of Washington Extra Fancy fruit. The fruit flavor, tree structure and growth habits appear to be identical to other Red Fuji sports. Fuji has firm, fine-grained sweet flesh. However, the outstanding characteristic of Fuji is that it keeps so well. Unlike most apples, you can put Fuji in a fruit bowl on your table and leave it there for up to two or three weeks and it still is nice and crisp. Another interesting thing about the tree itself is that the leaves stay nice and green well into November. I remember one sunny and mild November day when I was out picking Fuji and it seemed like it was the middle of summer with the sun glistening off the shiny green leaves! On the same day the Mac trees were practically bare and the few remaining leaves on the Jonathan trees were mostly yellowish-green. Fuji was developed in Japan and originally named Tohoko #7. Its parents are Red Delicious and Ralls Janet—both American apples.

Rootstock Emla 106: This rootstock produces a tree about half to two-thirds the size of a standard tree. It does not sucker and the rootstock is resistant to wooly aphid. EMLA 106 has been planted intensively in the East and West and is an excellent producer. It should be planted on well-drained soil as it is susceptible to crown rot.

Ginger GoldGolden Delicious (Ginger Gold strain): The best of the early goldens, Ginger Gold® has all the qualities of Golden Delicious but ripens six to eight weeks earlier. It can be picked green, just as color begins to turn, and will ripen to an attractive yellow color. It has a sweet, tangy flavor and firm, crisp flesh.

Rootstock Emla 7: A tree on this rootstock will be 50 to 60 percent smaller than a standard tree. Trees on this clone are the most popular of all the rootstock we grow. EMLA 7 does well on most soils. Some support may be needed in early years. EMLA 7 is very winter hardy. It is susceptible to suckering. EMLA 7 is extremely tolerant to fire blight.


libertyLiberty: A variety tolerant to many apple diseases making it an excellent apple for the gardener. Liberty produces a medium-size apple, sporting brilliant red color over yellow. The flesh is pale yellow and juicy.

Rootstock Emla 7: A tree on this rootstock will be 50 to 60 percent smaller than a standard tree. Trees on this clone are the most popular of all the rootstock we grow. EMLA 7 does well on most soils. Some support may be needed in early years. EMLA 7 is very winter hardy. It is susceptible to suckering. EMLA 7 is extremely tolerant to fire blight.


Cortland: This is THE salad apple because its nearly snow white flesh browns very, very slowly! This apple seems a bit unusual in that some years it seems it’s our most popular apple in its season (mid September to early October) and other years it’s way down on the popularity list. It has fine grained, juicy flesh and with one taste you’ll know one of its parents was the McIntosh. It is a cross of Ben Davis and McIntosh. This apple originated at the New York State Experimental Station in 1898. It was commercially introduced in 1902 and there are a number of strains.

Rootstock Emla 111: This rootstock produces a tree about two-thirds the size of a standard tree. Vigorous scion varieties and better soils may grow to three-quarter size or larger. EMLA 111 is a good producing rootstock, is well anchored and tolerant of drought conditions. It is widely adapted to most soil conditions.

Hardiness: Zones 4-9 • Height: Depends on rootstock • Spacing: Depends on rootstock.

Botanical: Malus domestica • Fruit: Green, yellow, red, purplish

Foliage: Green • Exposure: Full Sun • Harvest: Mid-July-October

Preparation

Apple trees require full sun, so choose a spot where the sun shines directly on the tree for at least 8 hours each day. When it comes to soil, apple trees can grow in most soils as long as there is no standing water and the pH of the soil is between 6 and 7. Avoid areas where water stands for several hours after a rain. If you are unsure about your soil pH, conduct a soil test to determine soil conditions before planting and amend the soil as suggested by the results.

Spacing

How much space do you need for apple trees? A good rule of thumb for a garden fruit tree is to provide at least as much horizontal space as the anticipated height of the tree. Closer planting will make it more difficult to keep the tree in its allotted space, increasing shading and reducing the number and quality of the fruit coming from your tree.

  • Standard trees: 20-25 feet
  • Semi-dwarf trees: 12-15 feet
  • Dwarf trees: 6-8 feet

Planting

Dig a hole for each tree that is no deeper than the root ball, and about twice as wide. When you dig the soil out of the hole, pile it on a tarp or piece of plywood so it’s easier to get it back in the hole. You may mix in up to one-third by volume compost, peat moss, or other organic matter. Most of what goes back in the planting hole should be the soil you took out of the hole. There is no need to add fertilizer to the hole.

If you purchased bare root trees, closely examine the root system and remove encircling roots or J-shaped roots that could eventually strangle the trunk. For containerized trees, inspect the root systems for encircling woody roots. If woody roots are wrapped around in a circle, straighten them or make several cuts through the root ball prior to planting. This may seem destructive, but it actually helps the plant produce a stronger root system and prevents the formation of girdling roots that eventually weaken the tree.

Position each tree so that the graft union is about 4 inches above the soil line. You can identify the graft union because there is a swelling where the cultivar meets the rootstock. If the graft union is placed close to or below the soil line, the cultivar will root, causing trees to grow to full size. Spread the roots of bare root trees, making sure none are bent. Have someone help you get the tree standing up straight. Begin adding the soil, tamping to remove air pockets as you go.

After the hole is filled, tamp gently and water thoroughly to remove remaining air pockets. The soil may settle an inch or two. If this happens, add more soil.

Initial pruning

If you plant a larger tree, remove any limbs originating from the base of the tree and any branches lower than 24 inches. If there are 2 or more branches competing to be the leader, choose one and remove the others.

Diagram of a small tree trunkPrune an unfeathered tree to about 30 inches tall, just above a bud. Make this cut at a 45° angle.

Diagram of a small tree trunk with protruding branchesFor a feathered tree, prune out any branches that are competing with the leader, that look weak, or that grow at an odd angle. Leave 2 to 3 strong, well-spaced branches.

If your tree has numerous branches, select 4 or 5 scaffold branches from those that remain, pruning out any other branches that are growing just above or just below scaffolds. The scaffold branches should have wide angles, at least sixty degrees relative to the trunk.

If you have purchased a small tree with little or no branches, prune the trunk to about 30 inches above the ground. This will induce branching, resulting in scaffold branch options the following year. If the tree has a few small branches, choose 2 or 3 sturdy ones at least 18 inches from the ground to keep as scaffolds and remove all others.

Planting is a good time to install a tree guard to protect your tree from winter injury and bark chewing by small mammals. These are usually made of plastic and are available at most nurseries and online. Tree guards exclude voles, also called meadow mice, and rabbits, preventing them from feeding on the bark. Guards also reflect sunlight from the trunk, which helps prevent the trunk from heating up on a cold, sunny winter day. If the bark temperature gets above freezing, water in the conductive tissue under the bark becomes liquid and begins to flow through the cells. When the sun goes down or behind a cloud, the liquid water suddenly freezes, damaging the cells and sometimes killing all the tissue on one side of the trunk. This is called sunscald.

Once the tree has rough and flaky mature bark, neither winter sun nor chewing animals can harm it, so tree guards will not be necessary. For the first years of its life, however, it’s important to protect the trunk of your fruit tree.

Watering

Throughout the life of the tree, you should water its root zone thoroughly during the growing season whenever there is a dry spell. Ideally, the tree should receive one inch of water from rainfall and/or irrigation every week from May through October.

Support

It’s a good idea to stake the tree for the first few years. Either a wooden or metal stake will work. A stake should be about the height of the tree after being pounded two feet into the ground. Use a wide piece non-abrasive material to fasten the tree to the stake. Avoid narrow fastenings such as wire or twine, as they may cut into the bark.

Continue reading this article HERE.

SOURCES:

Peaches:

Flamin’ Fury PF 1: The earliest ripening peach at Magicland Farms. Good quality flesh with high, red color blush over yellow background. Split pit prone but resistant to bacterial spot. A heavy bearer with good flavor. We recommend thinning PF 1 to promote better fruit size. Ripens 25 days earlier than Red Haven and is semi-clingstone.


CoralstarCoralStar: Coralstar® is a large, beautiful, 3″, freestone peach with 80% coral red fruit that matures with Loring. The flesh is firm and clear with wonderful sweet flavor. Coralstar® holds well on the tree and in the cooler and does not brown when cut. Its size and quality make it a star for local sale or shipping. It ripens with multiple pickings over a long period and will produce heavy tonnage per acre. The tree is hardy and resistant to bacterial spot. Ripens 22 days after Red Haven and is a freestone.


StarfireStarfire: Starfire® is a heavy annual cropper that provides high tonnage per acre with several pickings. It has large, 2 3/4″, solid bright orange-red fruit that ripens five days after Redhaven. The flesh is clear yellow with some red around a small pit. Starfire® has great shipping qualities and firmness. It is a very consistent cropper. Ripens 5 days after Red Haven and is a freestone.


Glowingstar:  It is a large uniform ripening peach that is 70% bright red with a yellow background. The fruit is firm, yellow and non-browning, with excellent shipping qualities and it stores well in the cooler. Glowingstar® is completely freestone and hangs well on the tree even when it is completely ripe. The tree is strong, vigorous and resistant to bacterial spot. Ripens 27 days after Red Haven.

Blushingstar: Blushingstar® is an incredible new high-quality white peach that ships and stores very well. It colors about 80% deep pinkish-red with a white ground color and averages 2 3/4″. It has the unique wonderful distinctive flavor of a white peach plus a penetrating, pleasing aroma. The flesh is white, tinged with pink and does not brown when cut. It sets very heavy crops and early, diligent thinning is a must. The tree is consistently heavy producing, very hardy and open growing with good resistance to bacterial spot. Ripens 27 days after Red Haven and is freestone.

 

Growing Peaches in the Home Garden.

 

Summary by Bill Shane, Michigan State University Extension.
The peach tree is relatively susceptible to damage by cold temperatures. Temperatures of -13°F or lower will generally destroy most peach flower buds and temperatures lower than about -17°F will cause damage to limbs, trunks, and leaf buds. Trees can be damaged by rapid temperature drops following a period of mild weather in early fall or early spring.Peaches in sites on higher elevation usually have fewer problems due to cold compared to low areas where cold air tends to settle.

 

Purchasing Trees
Purchase trees from a reputable garden dealer or nursery. Dormant medium-sized trees (1/3 – 3/4 inches in diameter) usually perform best. Most peach varieties are self-fruitful.  Trees for the Michigan climate should have one of the following rootstocks:  Bailey, Lovell, Halford, Chui Lum Tao, or Tennessee Natural.  Avoid Nemaguard, Siberian C, and Citation.  Guardian rootstock, developed in the SE United States, has performed well so far, but we have only limited experience in Michigan to date.  Pumiselect is a dwarfing rootstock that can result in a very small tree in sandy conditions.
Peach varieties
There are many yellow flesh peach varieties suited to the Michigan climate.  Varieties such as Madison and Reliance have a reputation for hardiness but are of medium quality.  Reliance has been overrated for winter hardiness.  Peach varieties with decent hardiness and good to excellent quality include Harrow Diamond (early), Starfire and Red Haven (midseason), Redskin (late August), and Harcrest (early September).   Canadian Harmony and Loring are favorites for fresh and canning but tend to less tolerant to cold temperatures.
White peach varieties grown in Michigan are White Lady, Blushingstar, Carolina Belle, and China Pearl.  Non-melting yellow fleshed canning peaches for the Michigan climate are Babygold 5, Vulcan, Vinegold, Virgil, and Venture.
Nectarine varieties suited for Michigan are: Mericrest, Hardired, Redgold, Fantasia, and Harflame. Nectarines are more prone to bacterial spot and brown rot diseases than are peaches.

 

Soil and Site
Peach trees prefer sandy loam to loamy soils and will do reasonably well in other soils provided they are well drained. Planting peach trees on mounds or ridges (5’ or more wide, approximately 6” high after soil settling) helps if the soil is heavier or is generally wetter than optimum.  Ideally, peach trees need full sunlight all day. The ideal soil pH is 6.5 to 7.0 and should be adjusted based on soil tests before planting.Plant fruit trees in early spring as soon as the trees arrive and the soil is dry enough to work (early April to May). If necessary, trees can be temporarily planted in a cool, shady spot for a few days before transplanting in the permanent site.  The roots should not be allowed to dry out.  However, try to get the trees in their permanent site promptly. Space peach and nectarine trees 10 to 18 feet from other plants.

 

Planting the Tree
1) Trim off any excessively long root tips or tips that are half-broken off.  Remove tags and wires.
2) Spend the time to dig a hole wide and deep enough to allow the roots to be spread out completely.  Do not wind the roots to fit in the hole.
3) Refill the hole, tamping the soil gently as you go to help avoid air holes.  Keep sod out of the hole.
4) Firmly pack the soil around the roots but do not strip roots off by excessive stamping. Watering after planting helps to settle the soil around the roots.  The soil around the base of the tree should be slightly higher than the surrounding area so that excess water does not collect there following rains.
5) Trees can be fertilized after rain has thoroughly settled the soil around the roots, about 3 weeks after planting. Apply up to 1/2 pound of 10-10-10 or other general fertilizer by spreading it lightly in a wide diffuse band 16 to 20 inches from the tree trunk.  Soils high in natural fertility may not need fertilizer in the first year.

 

Pruning
Peach and nectarine trees are pruned and trained each year to develop and maintain tree size and shape. They are generally trained into an open-center system with 2 to 4 major (scaffold) limbs forming an open Y or open center (vase) shape. Peach and nectarine trees are usually pruned in mid to late April.

 

Pruning at Planting
Head the central stem (leader) of a peach tree back to 30 to 36 inches from the ground at planting. Limbs arising from the central leader are scaffold limbs.  Remove all scaffold limbs closer than 2 feet to the ground.  Remove any upright scaffold limbs. Save no more than 4 scaffolds.  Shorten scaffold limbs by 1/3.

 

Pruning Young, Non-Bearing Trees
In spring the year after planting, select 2 to 3 well-developed, wide-angled scaffold limbs and cut off all other limbs nearly flush (leave a 1/3 inch stub) with the trunk. Head remaining scaffolds back slightly where growth has exceeded 30 inches.From the second to the fourth years, remove any branches that grow straight up or straight down. Prune lightly to eliminate overlapping and damaged limbs.

 

Pruning Bearing Trees
Peach trees bear fruit on shoots that grew the previous year. These 1-year shoots (fruiting wood) have one to three buds at each node. The smaller, center bud is a leaf bud accompanied by up to two larger, outer flower buds.  Moderately intensive pruning is needed each year to force the tree to grow new limbs.Maintain tree height at 9 to 10 feet by heading back scaffold branches to an outward growing lateral. Remove weak and diseased branches and excessive branches.  Trees with excessive growth have poorly colored fruit and leaves in the inside of the canopy due to poor sunlight penetration.

 

Fertilizing
Manage peach trees to ensure production of 10 to 18 inches of new growth each season. This is accomplished through pruning and fertilization as needed. Fertilizer should be applied in the spring before growth starts.  The most important nutrients for most Michigan soils are the nitrogen and potassium—the first and third number on a fertilizer bag.   A fertilizer with the formulation 10-10-10 contains 10% by weight of nitrogen.   A typical application per year to a young tree is 1/10 lb of actual nitrogen which translates to 1 lb of 10-10-10 fertilizer.  Adjust rates according to tree vigor. Phosphorus (the middle number) is generally not needed in Michigan soils.
Peach Thinning
Peach trees must be thinned in years when they bear a heavy crop to avoid limb breakage and to attain good fruit size and quality. Hand-thin peaches in mid to late June to an average spacing of one peach to every 6 to 8 inches of fruiting wood.Pest and disease control
Peach leaf curl is an intermittent disease that is easy to control with one spray, but timing is important.  Apply a material labeled for the disease (Carbamate (ferbam), Bordeaux mixture, fixed copper (various products) at 75% or more leaf drop in the fall or before 1st bud swell (no later).
For brown rot, remove old fruit from the tree before growth starts in the spring, spray once or twice during bloom with an effective fungicide (Captan or Immunox or others labeled for brown rot) and several times as the fruit starts to color.For insect control (oriental fruit moth, tarnished plant bug) use an insecticide labeled for tree fruit starting at the end of petal fall and at 1 ½ week intervals. There are combination disease and insect control spray materials available.  Read and follow the label carefully.
SOURCES:

Plums:

Santa RosaSanta Rosa (Japanese plum): The fruit is large, round and uniform in size. Santa Rosa has a dark red-to crimson-colored skin with delicious, yellow flesh. The tree is large and productive. Its flavor and fragrant aroma make it a favorite for eating right off the tree.

 

 

How to Grow Santa Rosa Plum

(http://homeguides.sfgate.com/grow-plum-trees-like-dwarf-santa-rosa-plum-61696.html)

Dwarf plum trees, such as the “Santa Rosa” plum (Prunus salicina “Santa Rosa”) require less space in the landscape while still producing an abundant crop of fresh produce each year. The small size of these dwarf trees also makes yearly pruning easier and mature fruit more accessible. The “Santa Rosa” variety requires fewer chilling hours than other plum varieties, allowing successful growth in warmer climates with an earlier crops. Hardy in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 5 through 9, the “Santa Rosa” plum tree thrives in fast-draining soil and full sunlight.

Clear the area underneath the tree’s canopy of weeds and debris. Spread a 2-inch layer of compost over the ground with a rake. Keep the compost 4 to 6 inches away from the tree’s trunk to prevent the bark from rotting.

Build a 3- to 4-inch ring of soil 6 to 8-feet in diameter for established trees and located around the perimeter of the root ball for young, newly planted trees. Position the soil ring around the trunk, so that the trunk is in its center. Tamp the soil in the mound firmly to secure it in place.

Water the tree when the top 2 to 3 inches of soil becomes dry. Fill the soil ring with water from a garden hose. Keep the soil consistently moist, but never soggy.

Fertilize the plum tree in the spring just before new leaves appear with a 16-4-8 nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium slow-release fertilizer. Apply the fertilizer at a rate of 1/2-pound for one-year-old trees and 1 pound for trees two years and older. Broadcast the fertilizer in a 12-inch wide band underneath the outer perimeter of the tree’s canopy. Rake the granules into the top 3 inches of soil. Water the area to a depth of 10 inches.

Whitewash the tree’s trunk in the winter or early spring when the tree has no leaves. Pour one part white latex paint and one part water into a bucket. Mix the liquids together until thoroughly combined. Brush a single coat of the whitewash onto the trunk with a paintbrush. Allow the first coat to dry completely before applying the second coat. This process will protect the tree’s bark from sunscald, which may cause it to crack open, allowing access to disease and insects.

Prune the tree each year in the late winter while it is dormant. Remove dead, disease and broken branches first. Cut out weak branches and those crossing or rubbing other limbs. Remove water sprouts and suckers, which generally grow straight up in the canopy or emerge from the trunk below the graft union. Thin the remaining branches. Remove no more than one-third of the tree’s branches at one time. Cut branches with diameters less than 3/4-inch with pruning shears, 3/4 to 1 1/2 inches with loppers and 1 1/2 inches or greater with a pruning saw. Make each cut 1/4-inch above an outward facing lateral branch, bud or the branch bark collar, the swollen ring located where the branch meets the trunk.

Thin the fruit just after it has set to encourage larger plums. Remove a maximum of one-fourth to one-third of the growing fruit.

SOURCES:

http://vanwell.net

http://homeguides.sfgate.com/

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Nectarines:

Flavortop: Medium to large fruit with a distinctive flavor and smooth texture. Yellow flesh and red and yellow skin color. The tree is vigorous and productive. Self-fruitful.

Nectarine Tree - Flavortop

For growing instructions see How to Grow Peaches above.

SOURCES:

http://vanwell.net

http://naturehills.com

Apricots:

Tilton: An excellent variety for drying and canning. It has a distinctive flavor. The fruit is medium to small in size. The color is golden-yellow with a dark red blush. Self-fruitful, it is a good pollinator for later blooming apricots.

Giant Tilton Apricot

SOURCES:

Cherries:

SantinaSantina: It is an early, black cherry from the Summerland, B.C. plant breeding program. It matures about eight days ahead of Bing with a sweeter flavor than other early dark cherries. It produces good sized fruit with oval shape and bright black skin and flesh. Despite being self-fruitful, Santina does not appear to overset. It is moderately rain tolerant, however, it cracks at the nose end when it does split.

Rootstock Mazzard: Fibrous root system makes Mazzard a good choice for wet and heavy soils. Mazzard is the most popular cherry rootstock grown in North America. It is generally more vigorous than Mahaleb, especially in poorer soils.
SOURCE:

PawPaws:

Pawpaw on Tree
We have available a mixture of root suckers and seedlings of various varieties and open-pollinated seedlings.
About PawPaws by Tom Fox
Close relatives of the pawpaw (Asimina triloba) all come from tropical or semi-tropical areas of the world.  Despite this, many pawpaws are quite hardy and strains which are native to the northern part of their range, from Nebraska through Michigan and into southwestern Ontario, seem to be able to withstand -25 F with ease. Strains from the deep south are not as hardy as this and will not survive most winters in Michigan.

Pawpaws do not do well in areas that have low humidity, strong winds or cool marine climates.  They do best when planted in rich well drained soil in a location protected from wind.  Pawpaws are normally found in wooded areas and often form dense thickets.  While pawpaw trees which get the most sun usually produce the most fruit, when the trees are small they should be protected from intense sunlight.  Planting them about 6 to 12 feet from the north side of a house, garage or similar building seems to be an ideal location.  Here they are protected from the sun when small and as they grow they receive more and more sun which they need to produce abundant crops.  If you plant them in the open, provide some means of protecting them from the direct sun for at least the first  two years.  Often even a large lawn chair placed next to the south side of the little tree will do.

Normally, pawpaw trees usually don’t start bearing until they are at least 7 years old.  However, with lots of TLC and a near perfect location and good soil, you can get them to bear earlier.   Keep in mind that pawpaws require cross pollination to get good crops which means it is recommended that you should plant at least two pawpaw trees.

For details on planting pawpaws and subsequent care follow the normal recommendations for planting any tree or shrub but here are a few tips.

Tip 1: Don’t neglect to prune it after you plant it.  Pruning always seems to help any tree or shrub survive its first year.  This is especially important with pawpaws.   The heavier you prune after planting the better are the chances the tree will survive the first year.

Tip 2: Water frequently the first two years.  Make sure the soil never dries out, but don’t waterlog the soil if it is heavy.  With real sandy soil it is nearly impossible to over water.  Tip 3: Watering frequently, with a bit of soluble fertilizer such as Miracle-Gro or a Miracle Gro wannabee,  will likely get your pawpaw trees growing faster and bearing earlier.

While ripe pawpaws will only keep a few days at room temperature, which is something like a banana, they will keep several weeks in a  refrigerator as long as its temperature is above 40F.  Regular bananas, of course, shouldn’t be kept refrigerated.

Note: To read my dad’s article that was in Grit magazine go to the URL: grit.com/garden/fruit/pawpaws.aspx

SOURCE:

Persimmons:

The common persimmon (Diospyros virginiana), also known as the American persimmon, is a tree native to the eastern United States. Cultivars include the Buhrman and the Delman. It is commonly grown as an ornamental but also is raised for its 3-inch-wide fruit. It thrives in USDA hardiness zones 4 through 8A, where it can reach a height of up to 60 feet. Oval green leaves 4 to 8 inches long cover the tree and turn a yellow or red color in the fall. In the spring, small white flowers dot the tree. When growing this persimmon, gardeners should provide it with well-drained and moist soil, though it can withstand some levels of drought and full sunlight. It is very hardy and has no serious pest problems.

 

 

Scientific Name: Diospyros virginiana

Common Names: Persimmon, Possumwood

Plant Type: Mid-size to large deciduous tree

Height: 30 to 70 feet

Cultivation Zones: 5 – 9, though some special forms are hardy in Zone 4.

Native Habitat: Valleys and dry uplands in clearings and mixed forests

SOURCES:

Blueberries:

blueberry_bluecropBluecrop: Deliciously sweet when eaten fresh or when flavor is captured in pie or preserves. For better pollination, plant at least two varieties. Medium size, mid-season. Height: 5′.
Jersey: Dark blue, small to medium size fruit that has a very sweet in flavor. Very productive plant, ripening in August. Berries are excellent for baking. Self-pollinating blooms, but cross-pollination produces the best fruit crop. Height: 4′ – 6′.
Aurora: Late ripening berries extend the harvest. Produces, large grape-like clusters of fresh, sweetly flavored berries from mid-August to September. Self pollinating, but will produce more berries, if a different variety is nearby for cross-pollination. Height: 5′ – 6′.
Elliot: Native American perennial shrub. Large,firm fruit, with delicious flavor, ripens in July. Two varieties of kinds of blueberry plants needed for for cross-pollination. Height: 4′ – 6′.
Patriot: This variety has good cold hardiness, and is a consistent top producer, 10-20 pounds per plant. Gigantic, tart, dusky berries with true blueberry flavor, ripen in late July. Height: 4′ – 6′.
Blueray: This bush is a heavy producer of high quality large, deep blue berries,  up to 1/2″ diameter. Berries ripen in early August, with outstanding dessert flavor. Self-pollinating blooms, but cross-pollination produces the best fruit crop. Height: 5′ – 6′.

Top Hat: It can be grown as a potted patio plant or as a foreground plant in the edible garden or landscape. It has a consistent round growth habit, strong flowering, and large fruit set of delicious berries. The leaves are small, finely serrated and glossy green. It is a new dwarf variety that grows only 20” tall x 24” wide. It originated as a multi-generational cross between true angustifolium ‘wild’ blueberries and standard northern highbush blueberry selections. Like all blueberries, it grows best in well-draining, acidic soil./div>

Hardiness: Zones 3-7 • Height: 2-6′ • Spacing: 5-8′

Cultivar Type: Highbush • Botanical: Vaccinium corymbosum

Fruit: Light to Dark Blue Berries • Harvest: Late July-September

Foliage: Large and Dark Green • Exposure: Full Sun or Partial Shade

Pests: No serious insect or disease problems.

Planting instructions: Prefers an acid soil. In alkaline soil, add ammonium sulfate for best results. Dig a hole large enough to encompass the roots without bending or circling. Set the plant in place so the crown (part of the plant where the root meets the stem) is about 1-2 inches below the soil surface. Add generous amounts of peat but no fertilizer when planting. Cover with soil to the original soil surface and water thoroughly. Mulch heavily to help retain moisture and keep weeds down.

SOURCES:

Raspberries:

Latham: This reliable favorite Junebearer ripens mid season and is long harvesting. Vigorous, productive canes and excellent fruit with a sweet flavor make this a garden favorite. Latham red berries are large, firm and attractive. Most popular variety; ripens in late June, cold hardy. Cut spent canes to the ground after they finish fruiting.

Plant as soon as soil may be worked in the spring. Your plants require 1″ of water per week during the growing season and regular, shallow cultivation. The bush will bear only on one-year-old stems. As soon as canes have produced fruit, prune them back to the ground to make room for the strong new canes. Additional pruning will be required to eliminate tangling and improve their ability to bear.

raspberry_jewel_blackJewel: It has large black raspberries that are shiny black, sweet and flavorful. A recent introduction from the New York Fruit Testing Station, plants are highly disease resistant, this is now rated the best of black raspberries. Also, the vigorous plants are early ripening, and in our experience a big improvement over the popular Bristol. Jewel is a cross between Bristol and Dundee. It is our most popular black raspberry variety. It produces excellent yields of superb quality berries. The fruit is glossy black in color, a large size, and has a rich raspberry flavor. It is an excellent choice for use in jams and jellies. Jewel is winter hardy and a very reliable choice. Blend into smoothies, bake in for a lively, colorful and lip-smacking treat. Make sure to grow enough to make preserves and enjoy the flavors of summer all year long. Plant is a high yielding producer of large, firm black raspberries.

Jewel produces fruit that is not only delicious and productive, but is also very good for you! New research has shown that black raspberries have some of the highest levels of phytonutrients of any dark-colored fruits. They’ve even shown cancer-prevention qualities. Raspberries are wonderful plants for birds because, if left unpruned, they form “thickets” that provide excellent nesting, roosting and hiding places for birds. The fruit, of course, is also a highly desired and healthy food source for birds.

If you’re looking for reliability and hardiness in raspberries, Jewel is for you. This berry laughs at our harsh winters, bounces back after subzero cold with firm, juicy berries so glossy black they shine like its name. Mid-season crops are bountiful. Rich raspberry flavor makes your mouth water! Recommended for both home and market growers. Plant as soon as soil may be worked in the spring. Your plants require 1″ of water per week during the growing season and regular, shallow cultivation.

Raspberry_Boyne2Boyne: The Raspberry, Rubus Boyne is THE summer producing red raspberry for extreme arctic climates! Released in 1960, Boyne is an early-season variety that is extremely winter hardy. Fruits are medium size and tremendously flavorful when they open in the middle of July. Boyne, is an attractive berry with a delicious sweet, aromatic flavor, making it an excellent choice for fresh eating, canning, freezing and desserts. Sturdy uprights canes will not need trellising to support the abundant fruit production. It consistently produces deep-red, medium-sized berries. It will grow where other varieties experience winter injury damage to the canes. Grows successfully in Zones 3-6. Fruit are borne on dwarf canes that are easy to pick. Boyne is an excellent plant maker and may bear a week or ten days before Latham. Heavy cropper.

 

Heritage: It is a widely planted everbearing variety is favored for fruit size, flavor and firmness. Bears a moderate early crop with heavy yields in late summer and fall. For fall only crop, mow canes to ground level in autumn after fruiting. Heritage, a variety of red raspberry released by Cornell University 35 years ago, was awarded a 2004 Outstanding Fruit Cultivar Award by the American Society of Horticultural Sciences. Strong and productive plant, spreads fast. Excellent variety for home gardener.
Hardiness: Zones 3-6 • Height: 3-4′ • Spacing: 24″ wide

Freezing Quality: Excellent • Fruit: Red and Black

Cultivar Type: Junebearing, Summerbearing, and Everbearing • Botanical: Rubus

Foliage: Green • Exposure: Full Sun • Pests: All Have Excellent Disease Resistance

Notes: It is an old favorite that is a good performer. The good yields of the ‘Boyne’ red raspberry bushes make it a leading commercial selection offering profitable production. Many suckers are produced in the mother plant, so that the ‘Boyne’ raspberry plant production capacity is high for commercial consideration, and the cost of increasing the size of a raspberry orchard is drastically reduced.

For freezing in commercial plastic grocery packs, the ‘Boyne’ red raspberry holds its excellent quality of flavor. The ‘Boyne’ raspberry is very cold hardy and is planted extensively throughout the United States as a top home or commercial garden choice berry selection.

Planting instructions: May be planted in any well-drained soil. Dig a hole large enough to encompass the roots without bending or circling. Set the plant in place so the crown (part of the plant where the roots meet the stem) is about 1-2″ below the soil surface. Cover with soil to the original soil surface and water thoroughly. Fertilize newly set plants 2-3 weeks after planting and again in early summer. Water well during growth, and consider mulching to conserve water until the following spring, when the mulch should be removed to let the plants warm up. In winter, cut back to about 5 canes per crown.

Cane berries prefer a deep, well-drained, fertile soil and typically bear fruit on 2-year old wood. Thrive in most soil types. Versatile and hardy in the coldest climates where other cane fruits fail. Plant late winter to early spring. Space 2′-3′ in a row with 8′-10′ between rows.

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Blackberries:

blackberry_fruitEbony King: This variety has earned its royal name by proving itself. Large, delicious purple berries are perfect for many a baking treat. Upright mostly thornless canes bear fruit in summer before hot days set in. Produces fruit in second year. Picking is easy and fun!

Furnish ample moisture during the growing period and cultivate frequently. After the first fruiting season, prune to the ground to allow room for new canes. Additional pruning should be done each spring to keep plants from becoming tangled and to improve their ability to bear. Successful growing depends on pruning the plant to 5-6 canes, along with training new canes to stand erect.

 

 

Hardiness: Zones 5-7 · Height: 5′ · Spacing: 4-6′ · Botanical: Rubus fruticosus ‘Ebony King’ · Fruit: Dark Blue/Black

Foliage: Large Green · Exposure: Full Sun · Harvest: Summer-Bearing

Pests: Anthracnose, botrytis and verticillium wilt can be serious disease problems. Cane borers and crown borers are potential insect pests.

Notes: Blackberries fruit on two-year old canes. After they have finished fruiting, the canes should be pruned away at the base. The fruit attracts birds. The brown thrasher, gray catbird, northern cardinal, northern mockingbird, and white-eyed vireo commonly nest in blackberry and raspberry thickets. Flowers attract butterflies, notably the western tiger swallowtail. Although the flowers are attractive, this blackberry is grown primarily as a fruit crop and is not considered appropriate for ornamental use.

Planting instructions: May be planted in any well-drained soil. Dig a hole large enough to encompass the roots without bending or circling. Set the plant in place so the crown (part of the plant where the roots meet the stem) is about 1-2″ below the soil surface. Cover with soil to the original soil surface and water thoroughly. Fertilize at planting and again in late spring.

Choose a sunny site in your garden with good air circulation and water drainage and a pH of 6.0-7.0. Keep roots moist until planting. Work plenty of organic matter into the soil and mulch to keep out weeds. Plant as soon as the soil has warmed. Trim canes to encourage new growth. Plants should be set out at least 2 feet apart in rows 7 feet apart. Trellising is beneficial for cane support. These summer-bearing berries produce fruit on second year canes (floricanes). In the fall of the 2nd year, prune spent canes at ground level and thin others to approximately 4 canes per foot of row. Cut off suckers which grow outside of rows. Trim remaining blackberry canes to 7 feet.

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Gooseberries:

Gooseberry_Pixwell2Pixwell: Pixwell is practically thorn-free and makes delicious pies, tasty preserves. The fruit hangs on slender stems an inch below the branches where they’re easy to pick – hence Pixwell. Pixwell is very hardy and does well in average soil. Pixwell originated in North Dakota in 1932. Medium sized, oval shaped fruit. It has pale green color becoming pink when fully ripe. Leaves turn purple in the fall. This variety is mildew resistant. Overall height is 4 to 6 feet tall. This is a very productive plant that is self-fruitful and should bear the first year after planting. Pixwell is too tart for fresh eating but great for jams and jellies. It produces white flowers in the spring, followed by fruit on old wood in mid-Summer.

Gooseberries are considered as a gift of nature to human mankind for the benefits it provides. No other single fruit or herb is as rich in different nutrients as a gooseberry. Gooseberries contain high amount of Vitamin C along with other nutrients like Vitamin A, iron, calcium, magnesium and potassium. A single gooseberry contains more than 500 mg of Vitamin C than orange, which is highly rich in Vitamin C. Also, the taste of gooseberries makes them a very preferred consumable item. Usually gooseberries are green to golden in color but some gooseberries can be deep purple in color as well.

Hardiness: Zones 3-8

Height: 4-6′ · Spacing: Width 3-4 ft. Plant 5 ft. apart.

Botanical: Gooseberry, Ribes uva-crispa ‘Pixwell’

Exposure: Sun-part Shade

Harvest: Mid-summer · Fruit: Yellowish-Green turning Pink as it Ripens

Pests: Mildew resistant. · Foliage: Green

Notes: Grows in average, medium moisture, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade, but prefers full sun. Plant in a location protected from strong winds and frost pockets. ‘Pixwell’ is a dense, rounded, glossy-leafed shrub suitable for hedge planting in open or shady areas. Needs regular summer and winter pruning to maximize fruit production. It is easier to prune than some other gooseberries since it is almost thornless.

Planting instructions: May be planted in any well-drained soil. Dig a hole large enough to encompass the roots without bending or circling. Set the plant in place so the crown (part of the plant where the root meets the stem) is about 3 inches below the soil surface. Setting the lower branches below the soil level encourages the bush form to develop. Cover with soil to the original soil surface and water thoroughly.

Frequent care and cultivation of your gooseberries will reward you with fruit year after year. A complete fertilizer should be applied once growth begins in the spring, and ample moisture provided throughout the growing season. Prune after harvesting.

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Grapes:

Seeded Green River: My dad found this variety of green grape growing on the farm when he bought it back in the 70s, he named it Green River. It has produced a reliable crop for many years. It is very sweet with a wonderful aroma when fully ripe. We have not been able to identify this as a known variety although it is comparable to the Niagara white grape in flavor, sweetness, and harvest time. Because of its high sugar content it is especially suited for jams and jellies, juice, and wine.
grape_relianceSeedless Reliance: From the University of Arkansas, it produces large clusters of round, red, medium-sized berries that tops for flavor and texture. What a perfect addition to your summer salad as well as an irresistible snack! An excellent eating grape that is good for jellies and juices. Stores well. The skins are tender and the flesh is melting in texture, with a sweet labrusca flavor. Coloring may be poor in some years, and fruit often crack in wet seasons. Cold hardiness is among the highest of the seedless varieties. Hardy and vigorous growing – a good strong variety. You will enjoy a generous midseason harvest. Vigorous, productive, dependable vine. Somewhat susceptible for black rot. Stores up to 3 months. Resists anthracnose and mildews. Ripens mid-August.
Seedless Concord: The old favorite blue-black grape that has been around for generations, but without those pesky seeds. Concord Seedless, though similar in flavor and texture to Concord, is unrelated. The clusters and berries are much smaller than those of Concord. The fruit matures earlier, has high flavor, and makes excellent pies and preserves. It is also the easiest for the home gardener to grow. Ripens first part of September.
grapes_blueconcord2Seeded Concord: Concord Grapes produce generous clusters of flavorful fruit. Concord is the most popular garden variety and has long been the backbone of the eastern grape industry. It ripens late and is ideal for jelly, juice, table use and wine. Skins slip easily from the dark-purple fruits. Almost all purple grape juice on the supermarket shelf was pressed from Concords. Ripens mid-September.

Hardiness: Zones 5-9 • Height: Varies • Spacing: 8-10′

Botanical: Vitis labrusca • Fruit: Dark-purple, dark-red, and green

Foliage: Large Dark-Green • Exposure: Full Sun • Harvest: Mid-August-Mid-September

Pests: Grapes are high maintenance plants that require regular chemical spraying and pruning. Grapes are susceptible to a large number of diseases, particularly in humid summer climates, including anthracnose, black rot, downy and powdery mildew, crown gall and botrytis bunch rot. Insect pests include phylloxera, grape berry moth, Japanese beetle, leaf hopper, leaf roller, mealy bugs and flea beetles.

Notes: Grapes are primarily grown for fruit production in home fruit gardens where ornamental interest is not a concern. However, grapes do in fact have good ornamental value: bold summer foliage, some fall color, showy fruit and shaggy, twisted trunking and branching often best seen in winter. When grown on fences, walls, trellises, arbors or other structures, grapes can be quite attractive year-round and can provide good cover, screening, or shade to areas around the home.

Planting instructions: May be planted in any well-drained soil. Dig a hole large enough to encompass the roots without bending or circling. Set the plant in place so the crown (part of the plant where the roots meet the stem) is about 1-2″ below the soil surface. Cover with soil to the original soil surface and water thoroughly. Fertilize when planting.

Best grown in deep, loamy, medium wet, well-drained soils in full sun. Tolerates a wide range of soil conditions, including average garden soils, but must have good drainage. Best sited in a location sheltered from winter winds (preferably a southern facing slope) and well removed from frost pockets. Self-pollinating. Grapes need a support system, training, regular spraying and regular pruning to maximize fruit production.

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Goji Berries:

Goji_BerryFirecracker: This “superfruit” is juicy and sweet when eaten fresh, or can be dried or frozen! Very high in antioxidants! ‘Firecracker’ has brilliant-red berries. It grows tall and wide, with a mounding habit. It is earlier to fruit and has a heavy production. The blooms are purple/white in early summer and then turn into scarlet red fruit in the fall. Self-pollinating. Drought tolerant. Prefers rich moist well-drained soil. Plant in sun or part shade. Flowering typically begins in the second year with maximum fruit production in the 4th or 5th year.

Also called, the Wolfberry, Lycium barbarum or Goji Berry, resembles a red raisin when dried. Members of the Boxthorn family, Goji berries are native to Southeast Europe and Asia and are related to the nightshade plants: potato, tomato, eggplant, tobacco and chili pepper. Goji leaves and root bark are used in traditional Chinese medicine. Goji berries are rich sources of antioxidants, carotenoids, lutein, zeaxanthin, iron, zinc, selenium, essential fatty acids and fiber as well as respectable amounts of protein. They’ve earned superfood status in the health food industry.

Goji berries are used throughout the Orient to treat a broad range of ailments and diseases. They are high in antioxidants, amino acids, essential fatty acids and are widely used to reduce inflammation.

Hardiness: Zones 3-8 • Exposure: Full Sun to Part Sun

Foliage: Green • Height: 60-84″ • Spacing: 60-84″

Harvest: Early Summer to Frost • Fruit: Brilliant-Red Berries

Soil: Adaptable • Botanical Name: Lycium barbarum ‘Firecracker’

Pests: It’s highly disease resistant and rarely bothered by insects. Even deer and rabbits leave it alone. There is no need for any chemicals or sprays.

Notes: They’re naturally drought tolerant and like well draining soil. Does not like wet roots. Train against a sunny wall for improved fruiting. Trim out diseased or damaged leaves and stems. Thrives in zones 3-8, tolerating temps down to -18 F. Does well in the dry west or humid east. Likes containers or the ground. Goji will grow in sun or partial shade, but your harvest will be greater with more sun. Your berries get sweeter the longer you leave them on the bush and will be much tastier than what you buy in the store. Eat them fresh, juice them, freeze them or dry them. Most people prefer to eat their berries like raisins. Grow several plants and enjoy healthy Goji Berries all year.

How to Grow & Planting instructions: Dig hole two times width of pot. Set top of root ball even with ground level. Combine planting mix and soil. Fill to ground level and tamp down firmly. Water to settle soil. Add layer of mulch to retain moisture and discourage weeds. Water regularly for the first year, then as needed once established.

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Kiwis:

Kiwi_ProlificProlific: This Kiwi is a self-pollinating variety that is early ripening and produces abundant crops of medium to large, sweet and tasty fruit. The cultivar is sometimes used as a pollinator for other female cultivars. Fruits are flavorful with reddish/violet on the skin and flesh when ripe. Minimum chilling requirements; 300 hours. These Kiwi have smooth skinned fruits so there is no need to peel the skin of the fruits unlike the fuzzy fruit species Actinidia deliciosa. Fruits vary in size, and are similar to several varieties of grapes. Plant stems and fruit buds are more cold tolerant than the A. deliciosa species and are mainly grown in colder areas where the cold temperatures can range from 10ºF to -18ºF. Fruit flavors are of course different with every cultivar, similar to all fruits.

The Hardy Kiwi is THE FRUIT OF THE FUTURE! Can bear fruit the first year after planting. It produces smooth-skinned fruit the size of large grapes in late summer to early fall, great for fresh eating, salads, dessert or jelly. Kiwi plants are attractive growers that require a sunny location, preferably with wind protection. They can be grown in different types of soils; however, the soil must be well drained. Kiwi plants are very pretty when used to cover a wall or fence or used in landscape design. The fruit’s use in recipes is endless.

Hardiness: Zones 4-7

Botanical Name: Actinidia arguta ‘Prolific’ • Plant Type: Vine

Fruit: Smooth green blushed with some reddish/violet on the skin when ripe

Height: 20-25′ or Grows to 12′ in Container • Spacing: 8′

Harvest: The hardy Kiwis ripen in Mid-Fall

Foliage: Green • Exposure: Full Sun

Pests: Relatively disease-free • Deer Resistance: Fair

Notes: Grows on grape-like vines and needs a wall or trellis for support. Needs regular watering – weekly, or more often in extreme heat. It thrives in full sun to partial shade, and prefers good soil on the acidic side. Do not fertilize this vine too heavily; this can trigger lush foliage growth but poor flowering and fruiting. Prune it as needed in late fall or early winter, or leave it be — this Japanese cultivar is adaptable.

Planting instructions: May be planted in any well-drained soil. Dig a hole large enough to encompass the roots without bending or circling. Set the plant in place so the crown (part of the plant where the roots meet the stem) is about 1-2″ below the soil surface. Cover with soil to the original soil surface and water thoroughly. Fertilize when planting.

Tolerates any soil type. Very vigorous. Relatively disease-free. Mulch to retain moisture and keep soil cool. Needs a trellis system. Flowers on one year old wood.

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Strawberries:

Fresca: Produces sweet, medium-sized everbearing berries the first summer until fall. For pots and hanging baskets.

 

Ruby Ann: Bears sweet, medium-sized everbearing fruit with large seeds. Its compact plant habit produces very few runners and displays sensational deep red flowers.

 

Honeoye: It is from the Cornell Research Station, Geneva, NY, and has been a top variety for over 20 years. It combines winter hardiness, high productivity, good appearance and color, together with an excellent, firm, large-sized berry. The large berries are easy to pick, and produce high yields over a long fruiting season, making it our most consistent berry producer. Home gardeners will also appreciate its excellent freezing quality. Optimum flavor is produced by growing this variety in medium to light soil. Honeoye is a vigorous plant with no soil-disease resistance.

 

strawb_junebearing
Eclair: This new gourmet berry is creating quite a stir at farmer’s markets along the west coast and preliminary trials across the nation are drawing raves as well. Fragrant, sweet, and juicy, with hints of raspberry and citrus, it should become the berry-of-choice for discriminating strawberry connoisseurs. Its unique taste is quickly becoming a favorite of those who have tasted it!! This “short day” or “Junebearing” variety has early season productivity of med-large, wedge shaped, extremely sweet berries, with medium firm flesh. The variety is resistant or very tolerant of garden soil diseases. With parent stock consisting of both “Junebearing” and “everbearing” varieties, it will produce fruit longer in to the season than Sequoia and other “Junebearing” varieties.
Hardiness: Zones 5-10 · Height: 6-8″ · Spacing: 12-18″

Botanical: Fragaria · Exposure: Full Sun · Foliage: Green

Junebearing

IRRIGATION

  • Throughout the growing season, 1″ – 2″ rainfall or equivalent is necessary per week, depending on soil.

FERTILIZATION

Establishment year

  • Mix ½ lb of 10–10–10 per 100 sq ft into soil 2 or more weeks prior to planting.
  • Side–dress with ½ lb 10–10–10 in July, August and September.

Subsequent years

  • Side–dress with 1½ lb 10–10–10 between renovation (see below) and early September.
  • Regularly check the soil pH and amend to keep at the optimum 6.5–6.8.
  • CAUTION: Over–fertilizing is detrimental.

WEED CONTROL

  • Thoroughly remove weeds prior to planting.
  • Weekly cultivation is required. Remember the roots are shallow. Take care not to damage the roots.
  • You may apply a granular herbicide to control weeds before they grow. Check with your local agricultural extension before using chemicals.
  • Proper mulching will aid in weed control.

RENOVATION

  • June–bearing strawberry plants require renovation. After all the berries have been harvested, mow or clip the plants and remove the clippings from the strawberry bed. Do not renovate in the planting year. (Ever–bearing/day–neutral strawberry plants are not renovated.)
  • Be careful not to cut or injure the crowns during this process.
  • Apply 1 lb 10–10–10 per 100 sq ft at time of renovation and ½ lb per 100 sq ft in September.

WINTER PROTECTION

  • Cover plants with 4″ of straw (not hay) mulch to protect the crowns. Salt hay is acceptable – do not use leaves.
  • Apply mulch after several significant frosts.
  • Remove mulch in early spring before new growth begins.

Everbearing

IRRIGATION

  • Throughout the growing season, 1″ – 2″ rainfall or equivalent is necessary per week, depending on soil.

FERTILIZATION

Establishment year

  • Mix ½ lb of 10–10–10 per 100 sq ft into soil 2 or more weeks prior to planting.
  • Side–dress with ½ lb 10–10–10 in July, August.

Subsequent years

  • Side–dress with ½ lb 10–10–10 in July, August.
  • Regularly check the soil pH and amend to keep at the optimum 6.5–6.8.
  • CAUTION: Over-fertilizing is detrimental.

WEED CONTROL

  • Thoroughly remove weeds prior to planting.
  • Weekly cultivation is required. Remember the roots are shallow. Take care not to damage the roots.
  • You may apply a granular herbicide to control weeds before they grow. Check with your local agricultural extension before using chemicals.
  • Proper mulching will aid in weed control.

RENOVATION

  • Ever-bearing / day–neutral strawberry plants are not renovated

WINTER PROTECTION

  • Cover plants with 4″ of straw (not hay) mulch to protect the crowns. Salt hay is acceptable – do not use leaves.
  • Apply mulch after several significant frosts.
  • Remove mulch in early spring before new growth begins.
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Rhubarb:

rhubarb_victoria2

Variety: Victoria

Stalks: Green with Red

Harvest: Late Spring-Fall

Height: 2-3′ • Spacing: 3-4′

Exposure: Full Sun • Foliage Type: Wide, ruffled leaves.

Hardiness: Zone 2-9. Rhubarb is grown all over the country (except in the deep South) and across much of Canada. It is very winter hardy and drought resistant.

Easy to grow:
1. Set the crowns just below ground level.
2. Fertilize the area liberally with manure or garden fertilizer.
3. Keep the soil moist and free of weeds during the growing season. Remove the flower spikes as they appear.

Planting instructions: Plant in early spring in any well-drained, fertile soil, in the sun. Space plants about 3 ft. apart. If planted too closely, they will be scrawny and more susceptible to disease. For best results do not harvest the first year and few the second year and following harvests will be bountiful for years to come. When harvesting, do not remove more than half of the stalks at any time so the roots will maintain their strength for the next season. To harvest, twist the stalk while pulling sideways and trim off the tops.

Harvesting Rhubarb: You’ll have to wait two to three years from the time of planting to the first real harvest. To harvest, twist the leaf stalk at the soil line; do not take more than a third of the leaves in any given year. Eat only the stalk, not the leaf.

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Fruiting Trees, Shrubs, and Plants

Apples Peaches Plums Nectarines Apricots Cherries PawPaws Persimmons Blueberries Raspberries Blackberries Gooseberries Grapes Goji Berries Kiwis Strawberries Rhubarb

Useful Links

How to plant fruit trees: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/planting_fruit_trees

Growing tree fruits at home: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/resources/michigan_fresh_growing_tree_fruits_at_home

Apple varieties: http://www.michiganapples.com/About/Varieties

Growing apple trees in the Midwest: http://www.extension.umn.edu/garden/yard-garden/fruit/apples-in-home-garden/index.html

Apple Ripening Chart: http://mooreorchards.com/index.php/our-apples/ripening-information.html

Home-Grown Peaches: http://extension.uga.edu/publications/detail.cfm?number=C1063

How to grow small fruits: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/resources/michigan_fresh_growing_small_fruits_at_home

Pure Pucker Power: Common Persimmon: http://www.eattheweeds.com/persimmons-pure-pucker-power-2/

Growing blueberries: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/topic/blueberries/growing_blueberries

Steps to Success (blackberries, blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, currants, and gooseberries): http://noursefarms.com/steps-to-success/

Integrated pest management for your vegetable garden: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/ipm_smart_pest_management_for_the_vegetable_garden

Starting a vegetable garden: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/planting_a_smart_vegetable_garden

Apples:

HoneycrispHoneycrisp: Widely publicized, Honeycrisp is a cross between Keepsake and an unknown apple variety. Originally thought to be a cross of Honeygold and Macoun, DNA testing has eliminated those apples as parents. This apple was developed by fruit breeders at the University of Minnesota. Until 2009, the university received royalties for every apple tree sold by any and every nursery in the US. This apple reaches its sweet, crisp perfection when grown in central and northern Michigan.
Rootstock Emla 106: This rootstock produces a tree about half to two-thirds the size of a standard tree. It does not sucker and the rootstock is resistant to wooly aphid. EMLA 106 has been planted intensively in the East and West and is an excellent producer. It should be planted on well-drained soil as it is susceptible to crown rot.

LodiMutsu/Crispin: Mutsu (pronounced moo-tsoo) was rated near the top of many taste tests, although pies made from it aren’t as highly rated. We have found many customers search this apple out when they are making sauce. This is a very large apple whose white flesh is crisp and juicy and has a touch of tartness. Mutsu is a cross of Golden Delicious and Indo. It was developed in Japan in the 1930s and first introduced into America after WWII.

Rootstock Emla 111: This rootstock produces a tree about two-thirds the size of a standard tree. Vigorous scion varieties and better soils may grow to three-quarter size or larger. EMLA 111 is a good producing rootstock, is well anchored and tolerant of drought conditions. It is widely adapted to most soil conditions.


scarlettspurRed Delicious (Scarlet Spur II strain): For almost two decades, Scarlet Spur was the most popular Red Delicious in the world with literally hundreds of thousands of acres in production. Now comes the next generation of America’s earliest, best coloring Red Delicious, Scarlet Spur II. Although Scarlet Spur® II finishes coloring about three days earlier than its parent, it has all the winning characteristics of the original – dark mahogany color, crisp white flesh, excellent fruit production and outstanding type.

Rootstock Emla 7: A tree on this rootstock will be 50 to 60 percent smaller than a standard tree. Trees on this clone are the most popular of all the rootstock we grow. EMLA 7 does well on most soils. Some support may be needed in early years. EMLA 7 is very winter hardy. It is susceptible to suckering. EMLA 7 is extremely tolerant to fire blight.

Auvil Early FujiFuji (Auvil Early Fuji strain): When Grady Auvil discovered this new Fuji sport, he predicted “it will revolutionize the Fuji market.” This sensational new strain matures about six weeks ahead of standard Red Fuji sports yet produces a higher percentage of Washington Extra Fancy fruit. The fruit flavor, tree structure and growth habits appear to be identical to other Red Fuji sports. Fuji has firm, fine-grained sweet flesh. However, the outstanding characteristic of Fuji is that it keeps so well. Unlike most apples, you can put Fuji in a fruit bowl on your table and leave it there for up to two or three weeks and it still is nice and crisp. Another interesting thing about the tree itself is that the leaves stay nice and green well into November. I remember one sunny and mild November day when I was out picking Fuji and it seemed like it was the middle of summer with the sun glistening off the shiny green leaves! On the same day the Mac trees were practically bare and the few remaining leaves on the Jonathan trees were mostly yellowish-green. Fuji was developed in Japan and originally named Tohoko #7. Its parents are Red Delicious and Ralls Janet—both American apples.

Rootstock Emla 106: This rootstock produces a tree about half to two-thirds the size of a standard tree. It does not sucker and the rootstock is resistant to wooly aphid. EMLA 106 has been planted intensively in the East and West and is an excellent producer. It should be planted on well-drained soil as it is susceptible to crown rot.

Ginger GoldGolden Delicious (Ginger Gold strain): The best of the early goldens, Ginger Gold® has all the qualities of Golden Delicious but ripens six to eight weeks earlier. It can be picked green, just as color begins to turn, and will ripen to an attractive yellow color. It has a sweet, tangy flavor and firm, crisp flesh.

Rootstock Emla 7: A tree on this rootstock will be 50 to 60 percent smaller than a standard tree. Trees on this clone are the most popular of all the rootstock we grow. EMLA 7 does well on most soils. Some support may be needed in early years. EMLA 7 is very winter hardy. It is susceptible to suckering. EMLA 7 is extremely tolerant to fire blight.


libertyLiberty: A variety tolerant to many apple diseases making it an excellent apple for the gardener. Liberty produces a medium-size apple, sporting brilliant red color over yellow. The flesh is pale yellow and juicy.

Rootstock Emla 7: A tree on this rootstock will be 50 to 60 percent smaller than a standard tree. Trees on this clone are the most popular of all the rootstock we grow. EMLA 7 does well on most soils. Some support may be needed in early years. EMLA 7 is very winter hardy. It is susceptible to suckering. EMLA 7 is extremely tolerant to fire blight.


Cortland: This is THE salad apple because its nearly snow white flesh browns very, very slowly! This apple seems a bit unusual in that some years it seems it’s our most popular apple in its season (mid September to early October) and other years it’s way down on the popularity list. It has fine grained, juicy flesh and with one taste you’ll know one of its parents was the McIntosh. It is a cross of Ben Davis and McIntosh. This apple originated at the New York State Experimental Station in 1898. It was commercially introduced in 1902 and there are a number of strains.

Rootstock Emla 111: This rootstock produces a tree about two-thirds the size of a standard tree. Vigorous scion varieties and better soils may grow to three-quarter size or larger. EMLA 111 is a good producing rootstock, is well anchored and tolerant of drought conditions. It is widely adapted to most soil conditions.

Hardiness: Zones 4-9 • Height: Depends on rootstock • Spacing: Depends on rootstock.

Botanical: Malus domestica • Fruit: Green, yellow, red, purplish

Foliage: Green • Exposure: Full Sun • Harvest: Mid-July-October

Preparation

Apple trees require full sun, so choose a spot where the sun shines directly on the tree for at least 8 hours each day. When it comes to soil, apple trees can grow in most soils as long as there is no standing water and the pH of the soil is between 6 and 7. Avoid areas where water stands for several hours after a rain. If you are unsure about your soil pH, conduct a soil test to determine soil conditions before planting and amend the soil as suggested by the results.

Spacing

How much space do you need for apple trees? A good rule of thumb for a garden fruit tree is to provide at least as much horizontal space as the anticipated height of the tree. Closer planting will make it more difficult to keep the tree in its allotted space, increasing shading and reducing the number and quality of the fruit coming from your tree.

  • Standard trees: 20-25 feet
  • Semi-dwarf trees: 12-15 feet
  • Dwarf trees: 6-8 feet

Planting

Dig a hole for each tree that is no deeper than the root ball, and about twice as wide. When you dig the soil out of the hole, pile it on a tarp or piece of plywood so it’s easier to get it back in the hole. You may mix in up to one-third by volume compost, peat moss, or other organic matter. Most of what goes back in the planting hole should be the soil you took out of the hole. There is no need to add fertilizer to the hole.

If you purchased bare root trees, closely examine the root system and remove encircling roots or J-shaped roots that could eventually strangle the trunk. For containerized trees, inspect the root systems for encircling woody roots. If woody roots are wrapped around in a circle, straighten them or make several cuts through the root ball prior to planting. This may seem destructive, but it actually helps the plant produce a stronger root system and prevents the formation of girdling roots that eventually weaken the tree.

Position each tree so that the graft union is about 4 inches above the soil line. You can identify the graft union because there is a swelling where the cultivar meets the rootstock. If the graft union is placed close to or below the soil line, the cultivar will root, causing trees to grow to full size. Spread the roots of bare root trees, making sure none are bent. Have someone help you get the tree standing up straight. Begin adding the soil, tamping to remove air pockets as you go.

After the hole is filled, tamp gently and water thoroughly to remove remaining air pockets. The soil may settle an inch or two. If this happens, add more soil.

Initial pruning

If you plant a larger tree, remove any limbs originating from the base of the tree and any branches lower than 24 inches. If there are 2 or more branches competing to be the leader, choose one and remove the others.

Diagram of a small tree trunkPrune an unfeathered tree to about 30 inches tall, just above a bud. Make this cut at a 45° angle.

Diagram of a small tree trunk with protruding branchesFor a feathered tree, prune out any branches that are competing with the leader, that look weak, or that grow at an odd angle. Leave 2 to 3 strong, well-spaced branches.

If your tree has numerous branches, select 4 or 5 scaffold branches from those that remain, pruning out any other branches that are growing just above or just below scaffolds. The scaffold branches should have wide angles, at least sixty degrees relative to the trunk.

If you have purchased a small tree with little or no branches, prune the trunk to about 30 inches above the ground. This will induce branching, resulting in scaffold branch options the following year. If the tree has a few small branches, choose 2 or 3 sturdy ones at least 18 inches from the ground to keep as scaffolds and remove all others.

Planting is a good time to install a tree guard to protect your tree from winter injury and bark chewing by small mammals. These are usually made of plastic and are available at most nurseries and online. Tree guards exclude voles, also called meadow mice, and rabbits, preventing them from feeding on the bark. Guards also reflect sunlight from the trunk, which helps prevent the trunk from heating up on a cold, sunny winter day. If the bark temperature gets above freezing, water in the conductive tissue under the bark becomes liquid and begins to flow through the cells. When the sun goes down or behind a cloud, the liquid water suddenly freezes, damaging the cells and sometimes killing all the tissue on one side of the trunk. This is called sunscald.

Once the tree has rough and flaky mature bark, neither winter sun nor chewing animals can harm it, so tree guards will not be necessary. For the first years of its life, however, it’s important to protect the trunk of your fruit tree.

Watering

Throughout the life of the tree, you should water its root zone thoroughly during the growing season whenever there is a dry spell. Ideally, the tree should receive one inch of water from rainfall and/or irrigation every week from May through October.

Support

It’s a good idea to stake the tree for the first few years. Either a wooden or metal stake will work. A stake should be about the height of the tree after being pounded two feet into the ground. Use a wide piece non-abrasive material to fasten the tree to the stake. Avoid narrow fastenings such as wire or twine, as they may cut into the bark.

Continue reading this article HERE.

SOURCES:

Peaches:

Flamin’ Fury PF 1: The earliest ripening peach at Magicland Farms. Good quality flesh with high, red color blush over yellow background. Split pit prone but resistant to bacterial spot. A heavy bearer with good flavor. We recommend thinning PF 1 to promote better fruit size. Ripens 25 days earlier than Red Haven and is semi-clingstone.


CoralstarCoralStar: Coralstar® is a large, beautiful, 3″, freestone peach with 80% coral red fruit that matures with Loring. The flesh is firm and clear with wonderful sweet flavor. Coralstar® holds well on the tree and in the cooler and does not brown when cut. Its size and quality make it a star for local sale or shipping. It ripens with multiple pickings over a long period and will produce heavy tonnage per acre. The tree is hardy and resistant to bacterial spot. Ripens 22 days after Red Haven and is a freestone.


StarfireStarfire: Starfire® is a heavy annual cropper that provides high tonnage per acre with several pickings. It has large, 2 3/4″, solid bright orange-red fruit that ripens five days after Redhaven. The flesh is clear yellow with some red around a small pit. Starfire® has great shipping qualities and firmness. It is a very consistent cropper. Ripens 5 days after Red Haven and is a freestone.


Glowingstar:  It is a large uniform ripening peach that is 70% bright red with a yellow background. The fruit is firm, yellow and non-browning, with excellent shipping qualities and it stores well in the cooler. Glowingstar® is completely freestone and hangs well on the tree even when it is completely ripe. The tree is strong, vigorous and resistant to bacterial spot. Ripens 27 days after Red Haven.

Blushingstar: Blushingstar® is an incredible new high-quality white peach that ships and stores very well. It colors about 80% deep pinkish-red with a white ground color and averages 2 3/4″. It has the unique wonderful distinctive flavor of a white peach plus a penetrating, pleasing aroma. The flesh is white, tinged with pink and does not brown when cut. It sets very heavy crops and early, diligent thinning is a must. The tree is consistently heavy producing, very hardy and open growing with good resistance to bacterial spot. Ripens 27 days after Red Haven and is freestone.

 

Growing Peaches in the Home Garden.

 

Summary by Bill Shane, Michigan State University Extension.
The peach tree is relatively susceptible to damage by cold temperatures. Temperatures of -13°F or lower will generally destroy most peach flower buds and temperatures lower than about -17°F will cause damage to limbs, trunks, and leaf buds. Trees can be damaged by rapid temperature drops following a period of mild weather in early fall or early spring.Peaches in sites on higher elevation usually have fewer problems due to cold compared to low areas where cold air tends to settle.

 

Purchasing Trees
Purchase trees from a reputable garden dealer or nursery. Dormant medium-sized trees (1/3 – 3/4 inches in diameter) usually perform best. Most peach varieties are self-fruitful.  Trees for the Michigan climate should have one of the following rootstocks:  Bailey, Lovell, Halford, Chui Lum Tao, or Tennessee Natural.  Avoid Nemaguard, Siberian C, and Citation.  Guardian rootstock, developed in the SE United States, has performed well so far, but we have only limited experience in Michigan to date.  Pumiselect is a dwarfing rootstock that can result in a very small tree in sandy conditions.
Peach varieties
There are many yellow flesh peach varieties suited to the Michigan climate.  Varieties such as Madison and Reliance have a reputation for hardiness but are of medium quality.  Reliance has been overrated for winter hardiness.  Peach varieties with decent hardiness and good to excellent quality include Harrow Diamond (early), Starfire and Red Haven (midseason), Redskin (late August), and Harcrest (early September).   Canadian Harmony and Loring are favorites for fresh and canning but tend to less tolerant to cold temperatures.
White peach varieties grown in Michigan are White Lady, Blushingstar, Carolina Belle, and China Pearl.  Non-melting yellow fleshed canning peaches for the Michigan climate are Babygold 5, Vulcan, Vinegold, Virgil, and Venture.
Nectarine varieties suited for Michigan are: Mericrest, Hardired, Redgold, Fantasia, and Harflame. Nectarines are more prone to bacterial spot and brown rot diseases than are peaches.

 

Soil and Site
Peach trees prefer sandy loam to loamy soils and will do reasonably well in other soils provided they are well drained. Planting peach trees on mounds or ridges (5’ or more wide, approximately 6” high after soil settling) helps if the soil is heavier or is generally wetter than optimum.  Ideally, peach trees need full sunlight all day. The ideal soil pH is 6.5 to 7.0 and should be adjusted based on soil tests before planting.Plant fruit trees in early spring as soon as the trees arrive and the soil is dry enough to work (early April to May). If necessary, trees can be temporarily planted in a cool, shady spot for a few days before transplanting in the permanent site.  The roots should not be allowed to dry out.  However, try to get the trees in their permanent site promptly. Space peach and nectarine trees 10 to 18 feet from other plants.

 

Planting the Tree
1) Trim off any excessively long root tips or tips that are half-broken off.  Remove tags and wires.
2) Spend the time to dig a hole wide and deep enough to allow the roots to be spread out completely.  Do not wind the roots to fit in the hole.
3) Refill the hole, tamping the soil gently as you go to help avoid air holes.  Keep sod out of the hole.
4) Firmly pack the soil around the roots but do not strip roots off by excessive stamping. Watering after planting helps to settle the soil around the roots.  The soil around the base of the tree should be slightly higher than the surrounding area so that excess water does not collect there following rains.
5) Trees can be fertilized after rain has thoroughly settled the soil around the roots, about 3 weeks after planting. Apply up to 1/2 pound of 10-10-10 or other general fertilizer by spreading it lightly in a wide diffuse band 16 to 20 inches from the tree trunk.  Soils high in natural fertility may not need fertilizer in the first year.

 

Pruning
Peach and nectarine trees are pruned and trained each year to develop and maintain tree size and shape. They are generally trained into an open-center system with 2 to 4 major (scaffold) limbs forming an open Y or open center (vase) shape. Peach and nectarine trees are usually pruned in mid to late April.

 

Pruning at Planting
Head the central stem (leader) of a peach tree back to 30 to 36 inches from the ground at planting. Limbs arising from the central leader are scaffold limbs.  Remove all scaffold limbs closer than 2 feet to the ground.  Remove any upright scaffold limbs. Save no more than 4 scaffolds.  Shorten scaffold limbs by 1/3.

 

Pruning Young, Non-Bearing Trees
In spring the year after planting, select 2 to 3 well-developed, wide-angled scaffold limbs and cut off all other limbs nearly flush (leave a 1/3 inch stub) with the trunk. Head remaining scaffolds back slightly where growth has exceeded 30 inches.From the second to the fourth years, remove any branches that grow straight up or straight down. Prune lightly to eliminate overlapping and damaged limbs.

 

Pruning Bearing Trees
Peach trees bear fruit on shoots that grew the previous year. These 1-year shoots (fruiting wood) have one to three buds at each node. The smaller, center bud is a leaf bud accompanied by up to two larger, outer flower buds.  Moderately intensive pruning is needed each year to force the tree to grow new limbs.Maintain tree height at 9 to 10 feet by heading back scaffold branches to an outward growing lateral. Remove weak and diseased branches and excessive branches.  Trees with excessive growth have poorly colored fruit and leaves in the inside of the canopy due to poor sunlight penetration.

 

Fertilizing
Manage peach trees to ensure production of 10 to 18 inches of new growth each season. This is accomplished through pruning and fertilization as needed. Fertilizer should be applied in the spring before growth starts.  The most important nutrients for most Michigan soils are the nitrogen and potassium—the first and third number on a fertilizer bag.   A fertilizer with the formulation 10-10-10 contains 10% by weight of nitrogen.   A typical application per year to a young tree is 1/10 lb of actual nitrogen which translates to 1 lb of 10-10-10 fertilizer.  Adjust rates according to tree vigor. Phosphorus (the middle number) is generally not needed in Michigan soils.
Peach Thinning
Peach trees must be thinned in years when they bear a heavy crop to avoid limb breakage and to attain good fruit size and quality. Hand-thin peaches in mid to late June to an average spacing of one peach to every 6 to 8 inches of fruiting wood.Pest and disease control
Peach leaf curl is an intermittent disease that is easy to control with one spray, but timing is important.  Apply a material labeled for the disease (Carbamate (ferbam), Bordeaux mixture, fixed copper (various products) at 75% or more leaf drop in the fall or before 1st bud swell (no later).
For brown rot, remove old fruit from the tree before growth starts in the spring, spray once or twice during bloom with an effective fungicide (Captan or Immunox or others labeled for brown rot) and several times as the fruit starts to color.For insect control (oriental fruit moth, tarnished plant bug) use an insecticide labeled for tree fruit starting at the end of petal fall and at 1 ½ week intervals. There are combination disease and insect control spray materials available.  Read and follow the label carefully.
SOURCES:

Plums:

Santa RosaSanta Rosa (Japanese plum): The fruit is large, round and uniform in size. Santa Rosa has a dark red-to crimson-colored skin with delicious, yellow flesh. The tree is large and productive. Its flavor and fragrant aroma make it a favorite for eating right off the tree.

 

 

How to Grow Santa Rosa Plum

(http://homeguides.sfgate.com/grow-plum-trees-like-dwarf-santa-rosa-plum-61696.html)

Dwarf plum trees, such as the “Santa Rosa” plum (Prunus salicina “Santa Rosa”) require less space in the landscape while still producing an abundant crop of fresh produce each year. The small size of these dwarf trees also makes yearly pruning easier and mature fruit more accessible. The “Santa Rosa” variety requires fewer chilling hours than other plum varieties, allowing successful growth in warmer climates with an earlier crops. Hardy in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 5 through 9, the “Santa Rosa” plum tree thrives in fast-draining soil and full sunlight.

Clear the area underneath the tree’s canopy of weeds and debris. Spread a 2-inch layer of compost over the ground with a rake. Keep the compost 4 to 6 inches away from the tree’s trunk to prevent the bark from rotting.

Build a 3- to 4-inch ring of soil 6 to 8-feet in diameter for established trees and located around the perimeter of the root ball for young, newly planted trees. Position the soil ring around the trunk, so that the trunk is in its center. Tamp the soil in the mound firmly to secure it in place.

Water the tree when the top 2 to 3 inches of soil becomes dry. Fill the soil ring with water from a garden hose. Keep the soil consistently moist, but never soggy.

Fertilize the plum tree in the spring just before new leaves appear with a 16-4-8 nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium slow-release fertilizer. Apply the fertilizer at a rate of 1/2-pound for one-year-old trees and 1 pound for trees two years and older. Broadcast the fertilizer in a 12-inch wide band underneath the outer perimeter of the tree’s canopy. Rake the granules into the top 3 inches of soil. Water the area to a depth of 10 inches.

Whitewash the tree’s trunk in the winter or early spring when the tree has no leaves. Pour one part white latex paint and one part water into a bucket. Mix the liquids together until thoroughly combined. Brush a single coat of the whitewash onto the trunk with a paintbrush. Allow the first coat to dry completely before applying the second coat. This process will protect the tree’s bark from sunscald, which may cause it to crack open, allowing access to disease and insects.

Prune the tree each year in the late winter while it is dormant. Remove dead, disease and broken branches first. Cut out weak branches and those crossing or rubbing other limbs. Remove water sprouts and suckers, which generally grow straight up in the canopy or emerge from the trunk below the graft union. Thin the remaining branches. Remove no more than one-third of the tree’s branches at one time. Cut branches with diameters less than 3/4-inch with pruning shears, 3/4 to 1 1/2 inches with loppers and 1 1/2 inches or greater with a pruning saw. Make each cut 1/4-inch above an outward facing lateral branch, bud or the branch bark collar, the swollen ring located where the branch meets the trunk.

Thin the fruit just after it has set to encourage larger plums. Remove a maximum of one-fourth to one-third of the growing fruit.

SOURCES:

http://vanwell.net

http://homeguides.sfgate.com/

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Nectarines:

Flavortop: Medium to large fruit with a distinctive flavor and smooth texture. Yellow flesh and red and yellow skin color. The tree is vigorous and productive. Self-fruitful.

Nectarine Tree - Flavortop

For growing instructions see How to Grow Peaches above.

SOURCES:

http://vanwell.net

http://naturehills.com

Apricots:

Tilton: An excellent variety for drying and canning. It has a distinctive flavor. The fruit is medium to small in size. The color is golden-yellow with a dark red blush. Self-fruitful, it is a good pollinator for later blooming apricots.

Giant Tilton Apricot

SOURCES:

Cherries:

SantinaSantina: It is an early, black cherry from the Summerland, B.C. plant breeding program. It matures about eight days ahead of Bing with a sweeter flavor than other early dark cherries. It produces good sized fruit with oval shape and bright black skin and flesh. Despite being self-fruitful, Santina does not appear to overset. It is moderately rain tolerant, however, it cracks at the nose end when it does split.

Rootstock Mazzard: Fibrous root system makes Mazzard a good choice for wet and heavy soils. Mazzard is the most popular cherry rootstock grown in North America. It is generally more vigorous than Mahaleb, especially in poorer soils.
SOURCE:

PawPaws:

Pawpaw on Tree
We have available a mixture of root suckers and seedlings of various varieties and open-pollinated seedlings.
About PawPaws by Tom Fox
Close relatives of the pawpaw (Asimina triloba) all come from tropical or semi-tropical areas of the world.  Despite this, many pawpaws are quite hardy and strains which are native to the northern part of their range, from Nebraska through Michigan and into southwestern Ontario, seem to be able to withstand -25 F with ease. Strains from the deep south are not as hardy as this and will not survive most winters in Michigan.

Pawpaws do not do well in areas that have low humidity, strong winds or cool marine climates.  They do best when planted in rich well drained soil in a location protected from wind.  Pawpaws are normally found in wooded areas and often form dense thickets.  While pawpaw trees which get the most sun usually produce the most fruit, when the trees are small they should be protected from intense sunlight.  Planting them about 6 to 12 feet from the north side of a house, garage or similar building seems to be an ideal location.  Here they are protected from the sun when small and as they grow they receive more and more sun which they need to produce abundant crops.  If you plant them in the open, provide some means of protecting them from the direct sun for at least the first  two years.  Often even a large lawn chair placed next to the south side of the little tree will do.

Normally, pawpaw trees usually don’t start bearing until they are at least 7 years old.  However, with lots of TLC and a near perfect location and good soil, you can get them to bear earlier.   Keep in mind that pawpaws require cross pollination to get good crops which means it is recommended that you should plant at least two pawpaw trees.

For details on planting pawpaws and subsequent care follow the normal recommendations for planting any tree or shrub but here are a few tips.

Tip 1: Don’t neglect to prune it after you plant it.  Pruning always seems to help any tree or shrub survive its first year.  This is especially important with pawpaws.   The heavier you prune after planting the better are the chances the tree will survive the first year.

Tip 2: Water frequently the first two years.  Make sure the soil never dries out, but don’t waterlog the soil if it is heavy.  With real sandy soil it is nearly impossible to over water.  Tip 3: Watering frequently, with a bit of soluble fertilizer such as Miracle-Gro or a Miracle Gro wannabee,  will likely get your pawpaw trees growing faster and bearing earlier.

While ripe pawpaws will only keep a few days at room temperature, which is something like a banana, they will keep several weeks in a  refrigerator as long as its temperature is above 40F.  Regular bananas, of course, shouldn’t be kept refrigerated.

Note: To read my dad’s article that was in Grit magazine go to the URL: grit.com/garden/fruit/pawpaws.aspx

SOURCE:

Persimmons:

The common persimmon (Diospyros virginiana), also known as the American persimmon, is a tree native to the eastern United States. Cultivars include the Buhrman and the Delman. It is commonly grown as an ornamental but also is raised for its 3-inch-wide fruit. It thrives in USDA hardiness zones 4 through 8A, where it can reach a height of up to 60 feet. Oval green leaves 4 to 8 inches long cover the tree and turn a yellow or red color in the fall. In the spring, small white flowers dot the tree. When growing this persimmon, gardeners should provide it with well-drained and moist soil, though it can withstand some levels of drought and full sunlight. It is very hardy and has no serious pest problems.

 

 

Scientific Name: Diospyros virginiana

Common Names: Persimmon, Possumwood

Plant Type: Mid-size to large deciduous tree

Height: 30 to 70 feet

Cultivation Zones: 5 – 9, though some special forms are hardy in Zone 4.

Native Habitat: Valleys and dry uplands in clearings and mixed forests

SOURCES:

Blueberries:

blueberry_bluecropBluecrop: Deliciously sweet when eaten fresh or when flavor is captured in pie or preserves. For better pollination, plant at least two varieties. Medium size, mid-season. Height: 5′.
Jersey: Dark blue, small to medium size fruit that has a very sweet in flavor. Very productive plant, ripening in August. Berries are excellent for baking. Self-pollinating blooms, but cross-pollination produces the best fruit crop. Height: 4′ – 6′.
Aurora: Late ripening berries extend the harvest. Produces, large grape-like clusters of fresh, sweetly flavored berries from mid-August to September. Self pollinating, but will produce more berries, if a different variety is nearby for cross-pollination. Height: 5′ – 6′.
Elliot: Native American perennial shrub. Large,firm fruit, with delicious flavor, ripens in July. Two varieties of kinds of blueberry plants needed for for cross-pollination. Height: 4′ – 6′.
Patriot: This variety has good cold hardiness, and is a consistent top producer, 10-20 pounds per plant. Gigantic, tart, dusky berries with true blueberry flavor, ripen in late July. Height: 4′ – 6′.
Blueray: This bush is a heavy producer of high quality large, deep blue berries,  up to 1/2″ diameter. Berries ripen in early August, with outstanding dessert flavor. Self-pollinating blooms, but cross-pollination produces the best fruit crop. Height: 5′ – 6′.

Top Hat: It can be grown as a potted patio plant or as a foreground plant in the edible garden or landscape. It has a consistent round growth habit, strong flowering, and large fruit set of delicious berries. The leaves are small, finely serrated and glossy green. It is a new dwarf variety that grows only 20” tall x 24” wide. It originated as a multi-generational cross between true angustifolium ‘wild’ blueberries and standard northern highbush blueberry selections. Like all blueberries, it grows best in well-draining, acidic soil./div>

Hardiness: Zones 3-7 • Height: 2-6′ • Spacing: 5-8′

Cultivar Type: Highbush • Botanical: Vaccinium corymbosum

Fruit: Light to Dark Blue Berries • Harvest: Late July-September

Foliage: Large and Dark Green • Exposure: Full Sun or Partial Shade

Pests: No serious insect or disease problems.

Planting instructions: Prefers an acid soil. In alkaline soil, add ammonium sulfate for best results. Dig a hole large enough to encompass the roots without bending or circling. Set the plant in place so the crown (part of the plant where the root meets the stem) is about 1-2 inches below the soil surface. Add generous amounts of peat but no fertilizer when planting. Cover with soil to the original soil surface and water thoroughly. Mulch heavily to help retain moisture and keep weeds down.

SOURCES:

Raspberries:

Latham: This reliable favorite Junebearer ripens mid season and is long harvesting. Vigorous, productive canes and excellent fruit with a sweet flavor make this a garden favorite. Latham red berries are large, firm and attractive. Most popular variety; ripens in late June, cold hardy. Cut spent canes to the ground after they finish fruiting.

Plant as soon as soil may be worked in the spring. Your plants require 1″ of water per week during the growing season and regular, shallow cultivation. The bush will bear only on one-year-old stems. As soon as canes have produced fruit, prune them back to the ground to make room for the strong new canes. Additional pruning will be required to eliminate tangling and improve their ability to bear.

raspberry_jewel_blackJewel: It has large black raspberries that are shiny black, sweet and flavorful. A recent introduction from the New York Fruit Testing Station, plants are highly disease resistant, this is now rated the best of black raspberries. Also, the vigorous plants are early ripening, and in our experience a big improvement over the popular Bristol. Jewel is a cross between Bristol and Dundee. It is our most popular black raspberry variety. It produces excellent yields of superb quality berries. The fruit is glossy black in color, a large size, and has a rich raspberry flavor. It is an excellent choice for use in jams and jellies. Jewel is winter hardy and a very reliable choice. Blend into smoothies, bake in for a lively, colorful and lip-smacking treat. Make sure to grow enough to make preserves and enjoy the flavors of summer all year long. Plant is a high yielding producer of large, firm black raspberries.

Jewel produces fruit that is not only delicious and productive, but is also very good for you! New research has shown that black raspberries have some of the highest levels of phytonutrients of any dark-colored fruits. They’ve even shown cancer-prevention qualities. Raspberries are wonderful plants for birds because, if left unpruned, they form “thickets” that provide excellent nesting, roosting and hiding places for birds. The fruit, of course, is also a highly desired and healthy food source for birds.

If you’re looking for reliability and hardiness in raspberries, Jewel is for you. This berry laughs at our harsh winters, bounces back after subzero cold with firm, juicy berries so glossy black they shine like its name. Mid-season crops are bountiful. Rich raspberry flavor makes your mouth water! Recommended for both home and market growers. Plant as soon as soil may be worked in the spring. Your plants require 1″ of water per week during the growing season and regular, shallow cultivation.

Raspberry_Boyne2Boyne: The Raspberry, Rubus Boyne is THE summer producing red raspberry for extreme arctic climates! Released in 1960, Boyne is an early-season variety that is extremely winter hardy. Fruits are medium size and tremendously flavorful when they open in the middle of July. Boyne, is an attractive berry with a delicious sweet, aromatic flavor, making it an excellent choice for fresh eating, canning, freezing and desserts. Sturdy uprights canes will not need trellising to support the abundant fruit production. It consistently produces deep-red, medium-sized berries. It will grow where other varieties experience winter injury damage to the canes. Grows successfully in Zones 3-6. Fruit are borne on dwarf canes that are easy to pick. Boyne is an excellent plant maker and may bear a week or ten days before Latham. Heavy cropper.

 

Heritage: It is a widely planted everbearing variety is favored for fruit size, flavor and firmness. Bears a moderate early crop with heavy yields in late summer and fall. For fall only crop, mow canes to ground level in autumn after fruiting. Heritage, a variety of red raspberry released by Cornell University 35 years ago, was awarded a 2004 Outstanding Fruit Cultivar Award by the American Society of Horticultural Sciences. Strong and productive plant, spreads fast. Excellent variety for home gardener.
Hardiness: Zones 3-6 • Height: 3-4′ • Spacing: 24″ wide

Freezing Quality: Excellent • Fruit: Red and Black

Cultivar Type: Junebearing, Summerbearing, and Everbearing • Botanical: Rubus

Foliage: Green • Exposure: Full Sun • Pests: All Have Excellent Disease Resistance

Notes: It is an old favorite that is a good performer. The good yields of the ‘Boyne’ red raspberry bushes make it a leading commercial selection offering profitable production. Many suckers are produced in the mother plant, so that the ‘Boyne’ raspberry plant production capacity is high for commercial consideration, and the cost of increasing the size of a raspberry orchard is drastically reduced.

For freezing in commercial plastic grocery packs, the ‘Boyne’ red raspberry holds its excellent quality of flavor. The ‘Boyne’ raspberry is very cold hardy and is planted extensively throughout the United States as a top home or commercial garden choice berry selection.

Planting instructions: May be planted in any well-drained soil. Dig a hole large enough to encompass the roots without bending or circling. Set the plant in place so the crown (part of the plant where the roots meet the stem) is about 1-2″ below the soil surface. Cover with soil to the original soil surface and water thoroughly. Fertilize newly set plants 2-3 weeks after planting and again in early summer. Water well during growth, and consider mulching to conserve water until the following spring, when the mulch should be removed to let the plants warm up. In winter, cut back to about 5 canes per crown.

Cane berries prefer a deep, well-drained, fertile soil and typically bear fruit on 2-year old wood. Thrive in most soil types. Versatile and hardy in the coldest climates where other cane fruits fail. Plant late winter to early spring. Space 2′-3′ in a row with 8′-10′ between rows.

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Blackberries:

blackberry_fruitEbony King: This variety has earned its royal name by proving itself. Large, delicious purple berries are perfect for many a baking treat. Upright mostly thornless canes bear fruit in summer before hot days set in. Produces fruit in second year. Picking is easy and fun!

Furnish ample moisture during the growing period and cultivate frequently. After the first fruiting season, prune to the ground to allow room for new canes. Additional pruning should be done each spring to keep plants from becoming tangled and to improve their ability to bear. Successful growing depends on pruning the plant to 5-6 canes, along with training new canes to stand erect.

 

 

Hardiness: Zones 5-7 · Height: 5′ · Spacing: 4-6′ · Botanical: Rubus fruticosus ‘Ebony King’ · Fruit: Dark Blue/Black

Foliage: Large Green · Exposure: Full Sun · Harvest: Summer-Bearing

Pests: Anthracnose, botrytis and verticillium wilt can be serious disease problems. Cane borers and crown borers are potential insect pests.

Notes: Blackberries fruit on two-year old canes. After they have finished fruiting, the canes should be pruned away at the base. The fruit attracts birds. The brown thrasher, gray catbird, northern cardinal, northern mockingbird, and white-eyed vireo commonly nest in blackberry and raspberry thickets. Flowers attract butterflies, notably the western tiger swallowtail. Although the flowers are attractive, this blackberry is grown primarily as a fruit crop and is not considered appropriate for ornamental use.

Planting instructions: May be planted in any well-drained soil. Dig a hole large enough to encompass the roots without bending or circling. Set the plant in place so the crown (part of the plant where the roots meet the stem) is about 1-2″ below the soil surface. Cover with soil to the original soil surface and water thoroughly. Fertilize at planting and again in late spring.

Choose a sunny site in your garden with good air circulation and water drainage and a pH of 6.0-7.0. Keep roots moist until planting. Work plenty of organic matter into the soil and mulch to keep out weeds. Plant as soon as the soil has warmed. Trim canes to encourage new growth. Plants should be set out at least 2 feet apart in rows 7 feet apart. Trellising is beneficial for cane support. These summer-bearing berries produce fruit on second year canes (floricanes). In the fall of the 2nd year, prune spent canes at ground level and thin others to approximately 4 canes per foot of row. Cut off suckers which grow outside of rows. Trim remaining blackberry canes to 7 feet.

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Gooseberries:

Gooseberry_Pixwell2Pixwell: Pixwell is practically thorn-free and makes delicious pies, tasty preserves. The fruit hangs on slender stems an inch below the branches where they’re easy to pick – hence Pixwell. Pixwell is very hardy and does well in average soil. Pixwell originated in North Dakota in 1932. Medium sized, oval shaped fruit. It has pale green color becoming pink when fully ripe. Leaves turn purple in the fall. This variety is mildew resistant. Overall height is 4 to 6 feet tall. This is a very productive plant that is self-fruitful and should bear the first year after planting. Pixwell is too tart for fresh eating but great for jams and jellies. It produces white flowers in the spring, followed by fruit on old wood in mid-Summer.

Gooseberries are considered as a gift of nature to human mankind for the benefits it provides. No other single fruit or herb is as rich in different nutrients as a gooseberry. Gooseberries contain high amount of Vitamin C along with other nutrients like Vitamin A, iron, calcium, magnesium and potassium. A single gooseberry contains more than 500 mg of Vitamin C than orange, which is highly rich in Vitamin C. Also, the taste of gooseberries makes them a very preferred consumable item. Usually gooseberries are green to golden in color but some gooseberries can be deep purple in color as well.

Hardiness: Zones 3-8

Height: 4-6′ · Spacing: Width 3-4 ft. Plant 5 ft. apart.

Botanical: Gooseberry, Ribes uva-crispa ‘Pixwell’

Exposure: Sun-part Shade

Harvest: Mid-summer · Fruit: Yellowish-Green turning Pink as it Ripens

Pests: Mildew resistant. · Foliage: Green

Notes: Grows in average, medium moisture, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade, but prefers full sun. Plant in a location protected from strong winds and frost pockets. ‘Pixwell’ is a dense, rounded, glossy-leafed shrub suitable for hedge planting in open or shady areas. Needs regular summer and winter pruning to maximize fruit production. It is easier to prune than some other gooseberries since it is almost thornless.

Planting instructions: May be planted in any well-drained soil. Dig a hole large enough to encompass the roots without bending or circling. Set the plant in place so the crown (part of the plant where the root meets the stem) is about 3 inches below the soil surface. Setting the lower branches below the soil level encourages the bush form to develop. Cover with soil to the original soil surface and water thoroughly.

Frequent care and cultivation of your gooseberries will reward you with fruit year after year. A complete fertilizer should be applied once growth begins in the spring, and ample moisture provided throughout the growing season. Prune after harvesting.

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Grapes:

Seeded Green River: My dad found this variety of green grape growing on the farm when he bought it back in the 70s, he named it Green River. It has produced a reliable crop for many years. It is very sweet with a wonderful aroma when fully ripe. We have not been able to identify this as a known variety although it is comparable to the Niagara white grape in flavor, sweetness, and harvest time. Because of its high sugar content it is especially suited for jams and jellies, juice, and wine.
grape_relianceSeedless Reliance: From the University of Arkansas, it produces large clusters of round, red, medium-sized berries that tops for flavor and texture. What a perfect addition to your summer salad as well as an irresistible snack! An excellent eating grape that is good for jellies and juices. Stores well. The skins are tender and the flesh is melting in texture, with a sweet labrusca flavor. Coloring may be poor in some years, and fruit often crack in wet seasons. Cold hardiness is among the highest of the seedless varieties. Hardy and vigorous growing – a good strong variety. You will enjoy a generous midseason harvest. Vigorous, productive, dependable vine. Somewhat susceptible for black rot. Stores up to 3 months. Resists anthracnose and mildews. Ripens mid-August.
Seedless Concord: The old favorite blue-black grape that has been around for generations, but without those pesky seeds. Concord Seedless, though similar in flavor and texture to Concord, is unrelated. The clusters and berries are much smaller than those of Concord. The fruit matures earlier, has high flavor, and makes excellent pies and preserves. It is also the easiest for the home gardener to grow. Ripens first part of September.
grapes_blueconcord2Seeded Concord: Concord Grapes produce generous clusters of flavorful fruit. Concord is the most popular garden variety and has long been the backbone of the eastern grape industry. It ripens late and is ideal for jelly, juice, table use and wine. Skins slip easily from the dark-purple fruits. Almost all purple grape juice on the supermarket shelf was pressed from Concords. Ripens mid-September.

Hardiness: Zones 5-9 • Height: Varies • Spacing: 8-10′

Botanical: Vitis labrusca • Fruit: Dark-purple, dark-red, and green

Foliage: Large Dark-Green • Exposure: Full Sun • Harvest: Mid-August-Mid-September

Pests: Grapes are high maintenance plants that require regular chemical spraying and pruning. Grapes are susceptible to a large number of diseases, particularly in humid summer climates, including anthracnose, black rot, downy and powdery mildew, crown gall and botrytis bunch rot. Insect pests include phylloxera, grape berry moth, Japanese beetle, leaf hopper, leaf roller, mealy bugs and flea beetles.

Notes: Grapes are primarily grown for fruit production in home fruit gardens where ornamental interest is not a concern. However, grapes do in fact have good ornamental value: bold summer foliage, some fall color, showy fruit and shaggy, twisted trunking and branching often best seen in winter. When grown on fences, walls, trellises, arbors or other structures, grapes can be quite attractive year-round and can provide good cover, screening, or shade to areas around the home.

Planting instructions: May be planted in any well-drained soil. Dig a hole large enough to encompass the roots without bending or circling. Set the plant in place so the crown (part of the plant where the roots meet the stem) is about 1-2″ below the soil surface. Cover with soil to the original soil surface and water thoroughly. Fertilize when planting.

Best grown in deep, loamy, medium wet, well-drained soils in full sun. Tolerates a wide range of soil conditions, including average garden soils, but must have good drainage. Best sited in a location sheltered from winter winds (preferably a southern facing slope) and well removed from frost pockets. Self-pollinating. Grapes need a support system, training, regular spraying and regular pruning to maximize fruit production.

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Goji Berries:

Goji_BerryFirecracker: This “superfruit” is juicy and sweet when eaten fresh, or can be dried or frozen! Very high in antioxidants! ‘Firecracker’ has brilliant-red berries. It grows tall and wide, with a mounding habit. It is earlier to fruit and has a heavy production. The blooms are purple/white in early summer and then turn into scarlet red fruit in the fall. Self-pollinating. Drought tolerant. Prefers rich moist well-drained soil. Plant in sun or part shade. Flowering typically begins in the second year with maximum fruit production in the 4th or 5th year.

Also called, the Wolfberry, Lycium barbarum or Goji Berry, resembles a red raisin when dried. Members of the Boxthorn family, Goji berries are native to Southeast Europe and Asia and are related to the nightshade plants: potato, tomato, eggplant, tobacco and chili pepper. Goji leaves and root bark are used in traditional Chinese medicine. Goji berries are rich sources of antioxidants, carotenoids, lutein, zeaxanthin, iron, zinc, selenium, essential fatty acids and fiber as well as respectable amounts of protein. They’ve earned superfood status in the health food industry.

Goji berries are used throughout the Orient to treat a broad range of ailments and diseases. They are high in antioxidants, amino acids, essential fatty acids and are widely used to reduce inflammation.

Hardiness: Zones 3-8 • Exposure: Full Sun to Part Sun

Foliage: Green • Height: 60-84″ • Spacing: 60-84″

Harvest: Early Summer to Frost • Fruit: Brilliant-Red Berries

Soil: Adaptable • Botanical Name: Lycium barbarum ‘Firecracker’

Pests: It’s highly disease resistant and rarely bothered by insects. Even deer and rabbits leave it alone. There is no need for any chemicals or sprays.

Notes: They’re naturally drought tolerant and like well draining soil. Does not like wet roots. Train against a sunny wall for improved fruiting. Trim out diseased or damaged leaves and stems. Thrives in zones 3-8, tolerating temps down to -18 F. Does well in the dry west or humid east. Likes containers or the ground. Goji will grow in sun or partial shade, but your harvest will be greater with more sun. Your berries get sweeter the longer you leave them on the bush and will be much tastier than what you buy in the store. Eat them fresh, juice them, freeze them or dry them. Most people prefer to eat their berries like raisins. Grow several plants and enjoy healthy Goji Berries all year.

How to Grow & Planting instructions: Dig hole two times width of pot. Set top of root ball even with ground level. Combine planting mix and soil. Fill to ground level and tamp down firmly. Water to settle soil. Add layer of mulch to retain moisture and discourage weeds. Water regularly for the first year, then as needed once established.

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Kiwis:

Kiwi_ProlificProlific: This Kiwi is a self-pollinating variety that is early ripening and produces abundant crops of medium to large, sweet and tasty fruit. The cultivar is sometimes used as a pollinator for other female cultivars. Fruits are flavorful with reddish/violet on the skin and flesh when ripe. Minimum chilling requirements; 300 hours. These Kiwi have smooth skinned fruits so there is no need to peel the skin of the fruits unlike the fuzzy fruit species Actinidia deliciosa. Fruits vary in size, and are similar to several varieties of grapes. Plant stems and fruit buds are more cold tolerant than the A. deliciosa species and are mainly grown in colder areas where the cold temperatures can range from 10ºF to -18ºF. Fruit flavors are of course different with every cultivar, similar to all fruits.

The Hardy Kiwi is THE FRUIT OF THE FUTURE! Can bear fruit the first year after planting. It produces smooth-skinned fruit the size of large grapes in late summer to early fall, great for fresh eating, salads, dessert or jelly. Kiwi plants are attractive growers that require a sunny location, preferably with wind protection. They can be grown in different types of soils; however, the soil must be well drained. Kiwi plants are very pretty when used to cover a wall or fence or used in landscape design. The fruit’s use in recipes is endless.

Hardiness: Zones 4-7

Botanical Name: Actinidia arguta ‘Prolific’ • Plant Type: Vine

Fruit: Smooth green blushed with some reddish/violet on the skin when ripe

Height: 20-25′ or Grows to 12′ in Container • Spacing: 8′

Harvest: The hardy Kiwis ripen in Mid-Fall

Foliage: Green • Exposure: Full Sun

Pests: Relatively disease-free • Deer Resistance: Fair

Notes: Grows on grape-like vines and needs a wall or trellis for support. Needs regular watering – weekly, or more often in extreme heat. It thrives in full sun to partial shade, and prefers good soil on the acidic side. Do not fertilize this vine too heavily; this can trigger lush foliage growth but poor flowering and fruiting. Prune it as needed in late fall or early winter, or leave it be — this Japanese cultivar is adaptable.

Planting instructions: May be planted in any well-drained soil. Dig a hole large enough to encompass the roots without bending or circling. Set the plant in place so the crown (part of the plant where the roots meet the stem) is about 1-2″ below the soil surface. Cover with soil to the original soil surface and water thoroughly. Fertilize when planting.

Tolerates any soil type. Very vigorous. Relatively disease-free. Mulch to retain moisture and keep soil cool. Needs a trellis system. Flowers on one year old wood.

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Strawberries:

Fresca: Produces sweet, medium-sized everbearing berries the first summer until fall. For pots and hanging baskets.

 

Ruby Ann: Bears sweet, medium-sized everbearing fruit with large seeds. Its compact plant habit produces very few runners and displays sensational deep red flowers.

 

Honeoye: It is from the Cornell Research Station, Geneva, NY, and has been a top variety for over 20 years. It combines winter hardiness, high productivity, good appearance and color, together with an excellent, firm, large-sized berry. The large berries are easy to pick, and produce high yields over a long fruiting season, making it our most consistent berry producer. Home gardeners will also appreciate its excellent freezing quality. Optimum flavor is produced by growing this variety in medium to light soil. Honeoye is a vigorous plant with no soil-disease resistance.

 

strawb_junebearing
Eclair: This new gourmet berry is creating quite a stir at farmer’s markets along the west coast and preliminary trials across the nation are drawing raves as well. Fragrant, sweet, and juicy, with hints of raspberry and citrus, it should become the berry-of-choice for discriminating strawberry connoisseurs. Its unique taste is quickly becoming a favorite of those who have tasted it!! This “short day” or “Junebearing” variety has early season productivity of med-large, wedge shaped, extremely sweet berries, with medium firm flesh. The variety is resistant or very tolerant of garden soil diseases. With parent stock consisting of both “Junebearing” and “everbearing” varieties, it will produce fruit longer in to the season than Sequoia and other “Junebearing” varieties.
Hardiness: Zones 5-10 · Height: 6-8″ · Spacing: 12-18″

Botanical: Fragaria · Exposure: Full Sun · Foliage: Green

Junebearing

IRRIGATION

  • Throughout the growing season, 1″ – 2″ rainfall or equivalent is necessary per week, depending on soil.

FERTILIZATION

Establishment year

  • Mix ½ lb of 10–10–10 per 100 sq ft into soil 2 or more weeks prior to planting.
  • Side–dress with ½ lb 10–10–10 in July, August and September.

Subsequent years

  • Side–dress with 1½ lb 10–10–10 between renovation (see below) and early September.
  • Regularly check the soil pH and amend to keep at the optimum 6.5–6.8.
  • CAUTION: Over–fertilizing is detrimental.

WEED CONTROL

  • Thoroughly remove weeds prior to planting.
  • Weekly cultivation is required. Remember the roots are shallow. Take care not to damage the roots.
  • You may apply a granular herbicide to control weeds before they grow. Check with your local agricultural extension before using chemicals.
  • Proper mulching will aid in weed control.

RENOVATION

  • June–bearing strawberry plants require renovation. After all the berries have been harvested, mow or clip the plants and remove the clippings from the strawberry bed. Do not renovate in the planting year. (Ever–bearing/day–neutral strawberry plants are not renovated.)
  • Be careful not to cut or injure the crowns during this process.
  • Apply 1 lb 10–10–10 per 100 sq ft at time of renovation and ½ lb per 100 sq ft in September.

WINTER PROTECTION

  • Cover plants with 4″ of straw (not hay) mulch to protect the crowns. Salt hay is acceptable – do not use leaves.
  • Apply mulch after several significant frosts.
  • Remove mulch in early spring before new growth begins.

Everbearing

IRRIGATION

  • Throughout the growing season, 1″ – 2″ rainfall or equivalent is necessary per week, depending on soil.

FERTILIZATION

Establishment year

  • Mix ½ lb of 10–10–10 per 100 sq ft into soil 2 or more weeks prior to planting.
  • Side–dress with ½ lb 10–10–10 in July, August.

Subsequent years

  • Side–dress with ½ lb 10–10–10 in July, August.
  • Regularly check the soil pH and amend to keep at the optimum 6.5–6.8.
  • CAUTION: Over-fertilizing is detrimental.

WEED CONTROL

  • Thoroughly remove weeds prior to planting.
  • Weekly cultivation is required. Remember the roots are shallow. Take care not to damage the roots.
  • You may apply a granular herbicide to control weeds before they grow. Check with your local agricultural extension before using chemicals.
  • Proper mulching will aid in weed control.

RENOVATION

  • Ever-bearing / day–neutral strawberry plants are not renovated

WINTER PROTECTION

  • Cover plants with 4″ of straw (not hay) mulch to protect the crowns. Salt hay is acceptable – do not use leaves.
  • Apply mulch after several significant frosts.
  • Remove mulch in early spring before new growth begins.
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Rhubarb:

rhubarb_victoria2

Variety: Victoria

Stalks: Green with Red

Harvest: Late Spring-Fall

Height: 2-3′ • Spacing: 3-4′

Exposure: Full Sun • Foliage Type: Wide, ruffled leaves.

Hardiness: Zone 2-9. Rhubarb is grown all over the country (except in the deep South) and across much of Canada. It is very winter hardy and drought resistant.

Easy to grow:
1. Set the crowns just below ground level.
2. Fertilize the area liberally with manure or garden fertilizer.
3. Keep the soil moist and free of weeds during the growing season. Remove the flower spikes as they appear.

Planting instructions: Plant in early spring in any well-drained, fertile soil, in the sun. Space plants about 3 ft. apart. If planted too closely, they will be scrawny and more susceptible to disease. For best results do not harvest the first year and few the second year and following harvests will be bountiful for years to come. When harvesting, do not remove more than half of the stalks at any time so the roots will maintain their strength for the next season. To harvest, twist the stalk while pulling sideways and trim off the tops.

Harvesting Rhubarb: You’ll have to wait two to three years from the time of planting to the first real harvest. To harvest, twist the leaf stalk at the soil line; do not take more than a third of the leaves in any given year. Eat only the stalk, not the leaf.

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SunSugar Nursery LLC

SunSugar Nursery LLC

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